Posts Tagged ‘art installations’

Getting Wise To Watershed Waste With <em>One Man's Trash</em>

Getting Wise To Watershed Waste With One Man’s Trash

April 22, 2015  |  Uncategorized

Today is Earth Day and Bradley Maule has a bone to pick with Philadelphia. He just spent 52 weeks picking up our litter in the Wissahickon Valley and his collection isn't pretty. His evocative environmental art installation, One Man's Trash, opens today, April 22nd, at the Fairmount Water Works Interpretive Center. HC co-editors Michael Bixler and Maule caught up to get into some trash talk. > more

Seeing Between The Ci-Lines: St. Andrew's Chapel Awakened With Art And Geometry

Seeing Between The Ci-Lines: St. Andrew’s Chapel Awakened With Art And Geometry

February 27, 2015  |  Photography, Uncategorized

Temporary art installation Ci-Lines opens this Saturday inside the ornate, vacant St. Andrew's Chapel on Spruce Street in West Philly. We spoke with the project's artist Aaron Asis about community engagement, vacant and abandoned site activation, and urban preservation > more

Art In The Open In The Park On The River

Art In The Open In The Park On The River

May 12, 2014  |  Art & Design

This weekend, the popular Schuylkill Banks trail will become an outdoor art gallery. Sarah Barr previews Art in the Open Philadelphia 2014 > more

Resurveying The Deindustrialization

Resurveying The Deindustrialization

December 2, 2013  |  Art & Design

As the push and pull of the ongoing land bank legislation trudges along, vacant mega-lots like those in Kensington have jumped to the top of the news cycle. But they've long inspired artists to dig beneath the grime to find their story. Nicolas Esposito talks with one such artist, Maria Möller, as her Hexamer Redux project uses the old Hexamer maps to resurvey Kensington's post-industrial spaces > more

Imagining The House That Was Here In Point Breeze

Imagining The House That Was Here In Point Breeze

August 23, 2013  |  Art & Design

In ever changing Point Breeze, a temporary art installation looks to its past in a vacant lot. Joseph Poteracki chats with Maria Möller about The House That Was Here > more