North Broad Civil Rights Landmark Gets Historical Marker

 

“Two skylights on the 1876 Furness and Hewitt building are to be replaced.” | Photo: Avi Steinhardt, for The Inquirer

“Two skylights on the 1876 Furness and Hewitt building are to be replaced.” | Photo: Avi Steinhardt, for The Inquirer

  • A Pennsylvania historical marker was unveiled yesterday outside the Sullivan Progress Plaza (1968) on North Broad Street, where Reverend Leon Sullivan spearheaded the opening of America’s first shopping center that was developed, owned, and operated by African Americans. “In America, it’s about the dollar,” mused City Council President Darrell L. Clarke, speaking at the dedication ceremony. “Rev. Sullivan preached that we have to invest in our community and our people.”
  • NewsWorks reports that Philadelphia City Council is expediting the process of creating additional Keystone Opportunity Zones throughout the city, as the July enabling legislation passed in Harrisburg set an October 1 deadline for applications. According to Commerce Director Harold Epps, the bill that advanced out of committee recommends reduced tax burdens for vacant land in Northeast Philadelphia industrial parks, parcels in the Navy Yard, properties in University City and West Philadelphia, along with properties around Callowhill, portions of the former Budd Plant on Allegheny, and properties in American Street in North Philadelphia.
  • Inquirer culture critic Peter Dobrin surveys the ongoing renovations at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, which announced today that it is half-way in reaching its $25 million capital campaign goal. Current and future projects include construction of a back-alley ramp entrance in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, the replacement of two massive skylights on the Broad Street side of the main Furness and Hewitt building (1876), and “the creation of a new glass-triangle artist studio on the south side of the Hamilton Building facade that will allow passersby to watch artists at work.”
About the author

Stephen Currall recently received his BA in history from Arcadia University. Before beginning doctoral studies, he is pursuing his interest in local history, specifically just how Philadelphians engage their vibrant past. Besides skimming through 18th century letters, Steve is also interested in music and travel.

Send a message!



Leave a Reply

Comment moderation is enabled, no need to resubmit any comments posted.

Recent Posts
Kensington Workshop Keeps Neighborhood Clocking In

Kensington Workshop Keeps Neighborhood Clocking In

May 16, 2018  |  Last Light

Inside a 124-year-old mill in Kensington, World Manufacturing Inc. is buzzing with work orders. Theresa Stigale puts us on the production line with this photo essay > more

Take Me Up To the Ball Game! Rediscovering The Bleacher Houses Of North Philly

Take Me Up To the Ball Game! Rediscovering The Bleacher Houses Of North Philly

May 15, 2018  |  Vantage

Dave Coyne gives us a rooftop view of old Shibe Park and the backstory behind Swampoodle's little-known "bleacher houses" > more

On Motherhood & The Circle Of Life At City Hall

On Motherhood & The Circle Of Life At City Hall

May 11, 2018  |  Soapbox

For Mother's Day, Stacey Meadows takes us inside the Register of Wills office at City Hall with this moving personal essay > more

Neighbors Vote

Neighbors Vote “No” On Christian Street Church Proposal

May 9, 2018  |  News

A new design proposal to demolish and develop the site of Christian Street Baptist Church is met with unanimous disapproval from neighbors. Starr Herr-Cardillo has the story > more

The Urban Conversation Of Row House Window Displays

The Urban Conversation Of Row House Window Displays

May 8, 2018  |  Vantage

Mabel Rosenheck peeks inside the front window to examine Philly's tradition of row house expression > more

On Frankford Chocolate, Journalistic Integrity, And Hidden City

On Frankford Chocolate, Journalistic Integrity, And Hidden City

May 3, 2018  |  Vantage

Why a writer was allowed to use a pseudonym and what we're going to do about the issue going forward > more