SS United States Too Costly To Return To Ocean, Study Concludes

 

The S.S. United States set out on its maiden voyage in 1952, which would break the record for fastest trans-Atlantic crossing. It has sat moored and rusting at Pier 82 in South Philadelphia since 1996 | Photo: Michael Bixler

  • Pennsport’s S.S. United States will not sail again, reports The New York Times as a $1 million feasibility study conducted by prospective owner Crystal Cruises has revealed prohibitive obstacles in relaunching the vessel. The replacement of its long-dormant steam engines would require rebuilding a quarter of the hull. Crystal, owned by a Hong Kong firm, would bar the ship from flying the stars and stripes. However, the SS United States Conservancy’s optimism to preserve the ship in the long term hasn’t lost steam, as the extensive and expensive 3D scans undertaken by Crystal are thought to improve the prospect of finding another partner interested in remaking the ocean liner into a real estate development.
  • The School District has announced a $250,000 retesting program for lead in the drinking water of 40 of its schools, selected for their geographic dispersion, age, and statistical probability in containing children have higher-than-normal lead levels. Francine Locke, environmental director for the School District of Philadelphia, said “there were no indications that Philadelphia schools required extra testing, but rather that the program was a response to community calls for increased oversight.”
About the author

Stephen Currall recently received his BA in history from Arcadia University. Before beginning doctoral studies, he is pursuing his interest in local history, specifically just how Philadelphians engage their vibrant past. Besides skimming through 18th century letters, Steve is also interested in music and travel.

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2 Comments


  1. its no wonder the school district is a rumored 600 million in debt when they’ll dish out 250k for a free service

  2. I don’t think it should be back out as an active ship.

    However, I think it could be made into a museum like the Intrepid is in NY and that would cost a lot less I am sure. There is money to be maid there at $25 per person to go in and see come history.

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