Reading The Economic Tea Leaves As The Delaware Deepens

 

“The Drillboat Apache sits in the Delaware River near Marcus Hook, Pennsylvania. From December 2015 to March 2016, the crew on this boat was blasting rock outcroppings on the river bottom. It’s one of the last stages of a controversial project to deepen the river’s shipping channel by five feet.” | Photo: Kimberly Paynter, for NewsWorks

“The Drillboat Apache sits in the Delaware River near Marcus Hook, Pennsylvania. From December 2015 to March 2016, the crew on this boat was blasting rock outcroppings on the river bottom. It’s one of the last stages of a controversial project to deepen the river’s shipping channel by five feet.” | Photo: Kimberly Paynter, for NewsWorks

  • With crews now about 85% through with the $392 million deepening of the Delaware River by five feet, NewsWorks looks ahead toward the expected fruits—an additional 75,000 jobs at the port to handle the 2.5 million increase in cargo tonnage— while not ignoring all that is required to ensure their continuity amongst a crowded group of peer niche ports. And even then, after an estimated $1 billion for port infrastructure projects, there are few guarantees in securing a bigger piece of the pie any time soon. More certain is the ecological angle, as each blast into the bedrock recalibrate the estuarial ecosystem, eroding the wetlands and introducing saltwater farther north.
  • The Inquirer’s Alan J. Heavens takes a peek inside Jason Dempsey and Marc Pellicciota’s historically considerate reuse of the second building of the former T. Kenworthy and Brother mill at Shurs Lane & Pechin Street in Manayunk.
  • It appears that this will be the year that Phoenix, Arizona will supplant Philadelphia as the fifth most populous city in America, notes NewsWorks’ Keystone Crosswords. Although Sunbelt demographers have proven themselves overconfident before on this point, Phoenix’s 8% growth rate since the 2010 census (Philly’s was 2.5%) is just too much to defer the distinction any longer.
About the author

Stephen Currall recently received his BA in history from Arcadia University. Before beginning doctoral studies, he is pursuing his interest in local history, specifically just how Philadelphians engage their vibrant past. Besides skimming through 18th century letters, Steve is also interested in music and travel.

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3 Comments


  1. 75,000 jobs at the port seems a little high. Maybe regionally affected by the port?

  2. That is really interesting about the blasting and dredging possibly changing he ecosystem.

  3. Wow, that really is interesting, I agree Jim Clark.

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