A Pipeline For Economic Growth & Environmental Regression

 

“Philadelphia Energy Solutions is the largest oil refining complex on the Eastern seaboard. Half of all Bakken Crude traveling across the country by rail ends up at the PES plant.” | Photo: Nat Hamilton, for WHYY

“Philadelphia Energy Solutions is the largest oil refining complex on the Eastern seaboard. Half of all Bakken Crude traveling across the country by rail ends up at the PES plant.” | Photo: Nat Hamilton, WHYY

  • On Wednesday, the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce released “A Pipeline for Growth,” a 60-page sketch of how to win what is, according to energy boosters, a race against Gulf metropolitan areas to engender a regional energy market that could actualize shale-rich communities at the Schuylkill River’s upstate source while creating jobs at long-idle downstream refineries. It envisions Harrisburg expediting the process by appointing an ombudsman to help with the red tape, perhaps even through direct financial support, reports State Impact Pennsylvania’s Susan Phillips.
  • PlanPhillys Jon Geeting outlines three of the more ambitious proposals found in the Old City District’s Vision 2026 plan that was released last week. These include the creation of a shared, less arterial Market Street,  increasing access and programming to Christ Church Park,  and, perhaps, finding some intermittent use to the impressive, yet cacophonous, space beneath the Benjamin Franklin Bridge.
  • The original boxing ring and memorabilia from the historic Blue Horizon arena at 1314 North Broad Street are to be sold at auction this weekend, reports NewsWorks. The former international boxing nexus, operating from 1961 to 2010, will be transformed into a 94 room boutique hotel, with restaurant and jazz club, by Mosaic Development Partners.
About the author

Stephen Currall recently received his BA in history from Arcadia University. Before beginning doctoral studies, he is pursuing his interest in local history, specifically just how Philadelphians engage their vibrant past. Besides skimming through 18th century letters, Steve is also interested in music and travel.

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1 Comment


  1. Environmental regression? Where the heck do you think the electricity that powers your green car comes from? From natural gas mostly these days. Thanks for the editorial.

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