New Exhibit Chronicles Philly’s Conventions

 

Franklin D. Roosevelt accepts his renomination as the Democratic candidate for president at the University of Pennsylvania's Franklin Field , June 27, 1936 | Photo: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum

Franklin D. Roosevelt accepts his renomination as the Democratic candidate for president at the University of Pennsylvania’s Franklin Field , June 27, 1936 | Photo: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum

  • As Philadelphia prepares to host its 12th presidential primary convention since 1848, the Heritage Center of the Urban League presents, “Sweep the Country: Political Conventions in Philadelphia,” reports NewsWorks. Besides the usual display of campaign pins and posters, the retrospective offers a glimpse of political candidates in desperate struggle for ideological hegemony over their party. It was in Philadelphia that the Whig Party rendered itself obsolete by further stalling on the slavery question, and where, a century later, its old racist rival “The Democracy” of Jackson would begin its own recalibration with Harry Truman’s assent of the modern Civil Rights Movement.
  • Curbed Philly’s Melissa Romero resurrects this fascinating map of Philadelphia from data artist Eric Fischer. By filtering the geotagged information from Flickr users’ photos taken throughout the region, Fischer illustrated the marked difference between the photographic curiosities of locals and tourists–the visitor must get their shots of the Mall and Parkway, the native often limits the exploration of his city to Regional Rail cars.
  • Naked Philly considers the fortunes of Old City’s real estate market, with 10 homes approaching completion at 120 Race Street, to be soon followed by two separate adjacent projects that will deliver a combined 17 homes to Front & Race. Their expected $1 million price point does much to explain the continued expansion and filling of surrounding neighborhoods, the blog notes.
About the author

Stephen Currall recently received his BA in history from Arcadia University. Before beginning doctoral studies, he is pursuing his interest in local history, specifically just how Philadelphians engage their vibrant past. Besides skimming through 18th century letters, Steve is also interested in music and travel.

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