New Study Reconsiders Effects Of Gentrification In Philly

 

New home construction in Northern Liberties | Photo: Jeff Fusco, for the Philadelphia Business Journal

New home construction in Northern Liberties | Photo: Jeff Fusco, for the Philadelphia Business Journal

  • Add yet another report to muddy the statistical waters of the gentrification debate. In an study whose authors— Lei Ding and Eileen Divringi, of the Philadelphia Federal Reserve—freely admit as suggesting “counterintuitive” conclusions, mobility patterns were reviewed for residents of some of Philly’s more gentrifying neighborhoods during the dozen years from 2002-2014. As the Philadelphia Business Journal relates, the numbers show that despite discernible upshifts in home prices, the “mobility rates of more vulnerable residents in gentrifying neighborhoods are not significantly higher.” That said, the poor are finding it more difficult to move into such once affordable neighborhoods. The researchers conclude with an important caveat against projecting their findings too widely, as conditions in Philly actually engender less displacement pressures than in more expensive cities. This, says reporter Natalie Kostelni, is due to Philly’s “relatively stable economy and housing market, an abundance of institutions and, among other things, a tax abatement that promotes development.”
  • Mayor Nutter announced yesterday that, in furtherance of his administration’s campaign to make Philadelphia the greenest city in America, the City will install water fountains along the entire span of Kelly Drive in the spring, reports NewsWorks. The Water Department, which has literally won awards for the drinking quality of its water system, estimates that about 42% of all garbage that finds its way into local waterways is water bottles.
About the author

Stephen Currall recently received his BA in history from Arcadia University. Before beginning doctoral studies, he is pursuing his interest in local history, specifically just how Philadelphians engage their vibrant past. Besides skimming through 18th century letters, Steve is also interested in music and travel.

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