Debunking Open Streets Naysayers

 

"Traffics bans for Pope Francis' visit brought cyclists out on Third Street." | Photo: Charles Fox, for The Inquirer

“Traffics bans for Pope Francis’ visit brought cyclists out on Third Street.” | Photo: Charles Fox, for The Inquirer

  • This Old City dispels much of the fear-mongering shared by Dr. Joseph Martin, a Drexel professor of civil engineering, as quoted in an Inquirer piece yesterday in which he slams the growing campaign for Open Streets: “Is this just for the hell of it? So people can wander?” At times, Martin is out of his element (Drexel’s website lists him as specializing in “geotechnical and geoenvironmental engineering, waste management”), concocting frightful predictions of adjacent streets jammed by the traffic of double or triple the usual number of cars. Also, certainly arrangements can be made for any and all elderly persons inconvenienced by Open Streets.
  • Writing for Philadelphia magazine this weekend, Sandy Smith lauded the performance of SEPTA’s Broad Street Line for the weekend prior, which smoothly handled over three-times it average ridership. “The biggest lesson SEPTA learned from its past performance,” argued Smith,  “is not the logistical one but the one about the value of giving people clear and accurate information and keeping them informed as events unfold.”
  • On Saturday Germantown marked the 238th anniversary of its eponymous Revolutionary War battle a day early. NewsWorks shares photos of the Revolutionary Germantown festival, an annual reenactment of the Patriots’ route and open house to 16 other historic sites in the Northwest neighborhood.
About the author

Stephen Currall recently received his BA in history from Arcadia University. Before beginning doctoral studies, he is pursuing his interest in local history, specifically just how Philadelphians engage their vibrant past. Besides skimming through 18th century letters, Steve is also interested in music and travel.

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