Neighborhood Nomination: What Building Would You Like To See On The Philadelphia Register Of Historic Places?

 

Collage

There are approximately 10,800 properties listed on the Philadelphia Register, most of which lie in historic districts. The majority of neighborhood buildings remain largely unprotected. From left: Engine 46, Conkling-Armstrong house, Abbott’s Alderney Dairies, and Ott’s Camera | Photos: Michael Bixler

Last week we reported that the Historical Commission has released an interactive map of buildings and sites on the Philadelphia Register of Historic Places. These buildings are legally protected from demolition (though sidestepping that protection through the claim of “economic hardship” is common enough). Take a look at the map, what do you see?

Geographic limitation: most of the properties are in a limited number of historic districts and in Center City.

Use limitation: most of the properties are residential buildings built and/or designed by wealthy elite for the wealthy elite.

Most of Philadelphia, with its variegated landscape of churches, row houses, retail avenues, civic buildings, social clubs, factories and workshops, is missing. Without legal protection we are quickly losing these layers of our collective history–the working class, civic, immigrant, and ethnic and African American city. This everyman landscape, for all the deep layers of urban history it stores, is every bit as important as our collection of landmarks. Yet preservation tools have failed to account for them. Surely, we don’t need or want to preserve everything–we’re hungry for new architecture, too, and to represent our own period of history in the landscape–but without doing anything, we’re jeopardizing the very sense of Philadelphia being Philadelphia. We’re also declaring through law that sites of white Protestant history are more significant than sites of Italian immigrant experience or African American heritage. Why is preservation stuck so significantly behind the rest of our culture?

The foundation of the Barnes empire | 40th & Filbert

Designation worthy: The former Hotel Powelton at 40th & Filbert where Dr. Albert Barnes made his fortune producing the antiseptic Argyrol | Photo: Bradley Maule

No better example of this is the likely loss of the handsome church at 12th and Bainbridge Streets where the legendary Marian Anderson learned to sing, which we reported on last month. One of the problems is that nominating buildings to the register is time consuming; some expertise is needed. The staff of the Historical Commission is overstretched. Though they’re supposed to continuously nominate new buildings to the Philadelphia register, they do so only rarely because of underfunding. The same goes for the staff of the Preservation Alliance for Greater Philadelphia, which has lost the kind of consistent funding that would enable them to turn out nominations at scale. Another problem is that the nomination of key historic districts has gotten caught up in politics. Meanwhile, some parts of the city, like Germantown, have been largely ignored. The same for whole categories of buildings. The Archdiocese of Philadelphia has long fought attempts to list Catholic churches and so most are vulnerable to demolition, especially as they are desanctified and closed. St. Bonaventure is only one particularly painful example. But we are just as guilty, in the workshop of the world, of letting our industrial heritage dissolve away. Only a tiny portion of mills, factories, workshops, and railroad infrastructure has been protected from demolition. In this sense we fail to take this significant aspect of our of civic identity very seriously.

To begin to remedy all this, we’re going to turn to you. Beginning today and until November 17th, we’re crowdsourcing for buildings of architectural, historical, economic, and cultural history that are not now on the Philadelphia Register of Historic Places (no survey of Philadelphia buildings exists). We’re thinking of neighborhood buildings that matter to you, that give you quotidian delight. Great fire stations, libraries, retail storefronts, factories, churches, synagogues, banks, power stations, breweries, movie houses, and row houses. The buildings should be 50 years old, they should be justifiably important, and they should be physically distinctive.

Photo: Michael Bixler

Designation worthy: The National Shrine of St. Rita of Cascia at Broad and Ellsworth is a South Philly landmark and an eclectic, architectural gem | Photo: Michael Bixler

When you have an idea for a building, check first HERE if it’s on the Philadelphia Register of Historic Places, or consult the new interactive map. Then check HERE if it’s on the National Register of Historic Places. If it’s on the National Register (which makes tax credits available for restoration, but doesn’t protect from demolition) then half our work is done, as someone has already documented the building’s significance.

Fill out our simple form HERE. We’ll compile your buildings, publicize them, and then, later, crowdsource the manpower and expertise to nominate them to the Philadelphia Register. In partnership with the Preservation Alliance, we plan to hold nomination workshops in order to jumpstart the process.

Please take the time to submit your buildings HERE.


7 Comments


  1. All That Philly Jazz is a public history project. Among other things, we are mapping jazz-related historic resources. CC’s Nightclub was located in the former Hotel Powelton. If anyone has any information about this jazz spot, please share your stories on our website.
    http://phillyjazz.us/2015/01/28/ccs-nightclub/

  2. the gretz brewery…a grerat building..one of a kd…the Jacquins neighborhood in kensington…still has slate sidewak stones … i live in … northeast ottman ave…not too much history but we have many…many immnigrants…brasil.. souyh asian…india haiita…various arab countried…spanih….50,00 people in 19149 zip code

    good luck…i enjoy your articles

    ip code

  3. Diamond Street West of Broad Street to Vanpelt St.is Philadelphia’s first Historic corridor… Our well worn ,but Historic and sufficient architecture should be protected! There was a HAB survey completed in the last 1990-2000.How does that assist? Also out churches are Historic buildings and social …

  4. The powers that be might just draw a line around Philadelphia…

  5. The south side of Girard Avenue between Carlisle and 15th Sts is a fantastic row designed as a whole – a stunning thing. Sadly recently one of the facades was altered for retail. It ought to be saved!

Leave a Reply

Comment moderation is enabled, no need to resubmit any comments posted.

Recent Posts
The Rise, Fall, & Revival Of North Broad's Opera Palace

The Rise, Fall, & Revival Of North Broad’s Opera Palace

June 14, 2018  |  Vantage

Rob McClung takes us on a journey through the turbulent history and present reawakening of the mighty Metropolitan Opera House at Broad and Poplar > more

A Brief History Of Race & Contested Space In West Philly

A Brief History Of Race & Contested Space In West Philly

June 11, 2018  |  Vantage

Mariam Williams dives deep into the social evolution of Malcolm X Park to unearth the history of race and economics within a neighborhood space > more

Italian Market Project Puts Fresh Eyes On A Philly Staple

Italian Market Project Puts Fresh Eyes On A Philly Staple

June 8, 2018  |  Vantage

The Italian Market Project mixes a walking tour with Philly-accented theater in a fun, immersive experience. Mickey Herr has the details > more

Taking History To The Streets With Preservation Activism

Taking History To The Streets With Preservation Activism

June 6, 2018  |  Soapbox

Ali Roseberry-Polier discusses civil rights history, selective public memory, and why she created an historical marker for a Black female activist who challenged segregation in 19th century Philadelphia > more

A Buzzy New Beginning For Poth Brewing Company

A Buzzy New Beginning For Poth Brewing Company

June 4, 2018  |  Last Light

Before renovations begin, Michael Bixler takes us inside the remains of Poth Brewing Company with this photo essay > more

One Smart Cookie: When Keebler Called Philly Home

One Smart Cookie: When Keebler Called Philly Home

June 1, 2018  |  Harry K's Encyclopedia

Girl Scout cookies: another city first! Harry K. gives a whirlwind history of America's favorite cake and cracker maker, Philly's own Keebler-Weyl Baking Company > more