Civic Design Review Committee Takes A Stand Against Lackluster Old City Apartment Proposal

 

Rendering for proposed 216-unit apartment complex in Old City

Visually impaired. The design of this proposed 216-unit apartment complex in Old City could uses a serious rethinking | Rendering: Priderock Capital Partners

  • The Civic Design Review committee is not too happy with the preliminary design and material list of Priderock Capital Partners’ proposed 216-unit residential complex for the corner of 4th & Race Streets, reports PlanPhilly. Considering the location’s visibility while getting on and off the Benjamin Franklin Bridge, “it has got to be a great goddamn building,” stressed member Cecil Baker. His sentiments were widely shared among fellow committee persons, who have demanded that the project’s architecture come back with a revised design.
About the author

Stephen Currall recently received his BA in history from Arcadia University. Before beginning doctoral studies, he is pursuing his interest in local history, specifically just how Philadelphians engage their vibrant past. Besides skimming through 18th century letters, Steve is also interested in music and travel.

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4 Comments


  1. The architects could resort to using red brick clad panels to surround the entire building like is done with Citizens Bank Park. And the CDR objected to the design in order to give those who object to it being built a feeling of having won something at that meeting. Next meeting, the red brick clad panels affixed to the entire structure will easily pass muster and then get CDR approval for eventual ZBA approval.

  2. Craig M Oliner

    In response to James, you’ve misunderstood the CDR committee’s words and intent. No one wants red brick cladding.

    As committee member and architect Cecil Baker emphasized, the apartment mid-rise does not need to invoke any historical period — it can be modern — but it must be well designed. Kudos to the CDR for encouraging quality design.

  3. Can somebody please outlaw these repulsive ACM panels?

    They are proliferating like a weed.

  4. I prefer the faux Greek Revival loft building look that they’re putting up at Third and Market (not that I agree with the demolition that occurred in that location) rather than the architectural turd shown above… I realize people find the red brick boxes boring, but at least those like “Third and Market” are simple and attractive, and harmonize, rather than just some architectural drivel that is also uninteresting.

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