Comcast Developer Purchasing Entire Block Cater-Corner To Latest Skyscraper Build

 

“After the purchase of this building at 19th and Cherry Streets be the eventual site of another Comcast skyscraper?” | Photo: Philadelphia Business Journal

Will Comcast build another skyscraper after real estate investment trust Liberty Properties purchases this building at 19th and Cherry Streets? | Photo: Philadelphia Business Journal

  • Might Comcast be planning a third skyscraper? That is at least what many are speculating, says the Philadelphia Business Journal. Although the corporate giant denies that it is currently planning anything past its current build of the Comcast Innovation and Technology Center, Liberty Property Trust nevertheless has been quietly collecting parcels within the 1900 block between Arch and Cherry Streets (immediately south of Drexel University’s Academy of Natural Sciences). “Another tower in that area would establish an expanded urban campus for the cable giant and continue to push the city’s Central Business District deeper into Logan Square.”
About the author

Stephen Currall recently received his BA in history from Arcadia University. Before beginning doctoral studies, he is pursuing his interest in local history, specifically just how Philadelphians engage their vibrant past. Besides skimming through 18th century letters, Steve is also interested in music and travel.

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4 Comments


  1. That must be great to speculate on flipping the zoning of CMX-4 properties to CMX-5, especially if city council and the mayors office are bought and paid for. Kinda like shooting fish in a barrel. Too bad the rest of us have to lose all our light and air and live at ground level like rats. But then who gives a crap about the little guy, they can keep paying their taxes and live in the shadow of the latest ugly tower because there is no way the city will allow them to change their zoning. Unless they also pay to play.

  2. Thank goodness, that Child Advocates building has terrible brutalist architecture and should be torn down.

  3. Hardly “Brutalist” it’s simply “Modernist” and a rather good example I’m my book.

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