Public Green Plans For 40th Street Trolley Portal To Break Ground In 2015

 

View of 40th Street Trolley Portal from the trolley shelter | Rendering by Andropogon, courtesy of University City District

View of 40th Street Trolley Portal from the trolley shelter | Rendering by Andropogon, courtesy of University City District

Surrounded by some of the best Victorian-era residential blocks in Philadelphia, the ever-booming hub of Penn and its Medical Center, and the ornate gates of Woodlands Cemetery, a barren but crucial utilitarian landscape has long sewn University City and West and Southwest Philadelphia together. But the barrenness of SEPTA’s 40th Street trolley portal, where four green line subway-surface trolleys serve nearly 4,000 riders a day, will soon dissipate into a greener, cleaner, more inviting space. This year, though specific date uncertain, University City District will break ground on a $2.1 million overhaul that will include a new cafe and public gathering space with a reconfigured trolley platform.

SEPTA service at the portal, where routes 11, 13, 34, and 36 trolleys go in and out of the subway tunnel to Center City, will only be interrupted when work takes place within the trolley right-of-way—and only when SEPTA has maintenance scheduled at that. “SEPTA and University City District are coordinating the work to take place when SEPTA has already scheduled maintenance outages along the trolley lines, such as during the summer Trolley Tunnel Blitz and some weekends,” says Heather Redfern, SEPTA’s public information manager. “During those outages, trolleys do not operate in the tunnel and through the portal.”

Looking south across the plaza from Baltimore Avenue | Photo: Peter Woodall

Looking south across the plaza from Baltimore Avenue | Photo: Peter Woodall

The desire to renovate the Portal came from neighborhood residents, says Prema Gupta, UCD’s director of planning and economic development. It’s a concept that has been discussed for nearly decade, but began to gain traction in the last four years or so. Gupta says the new portal, designed by the landscape architecture firm Andropogon, will have a “meadowy-type feeling” when it’s done.

“You’ve got Penn here, you’ve got a fantastic residential neighborhood on this end, but this is sort of where the neighborhood falls off in a lot of people’s minds,” says Gupta. “The idea of creating something that would tie all these things together was really exciting for us.” The original plan for revamping the portal was to have been executed in two phases: the first to build a café and plaza on the Baltimore Avenue side, and the second to replace the concrete platform between the tracks and trolley stops (the “apron”) with planters and pedestrian-guiding pathways. But talks with public agencies, including SEPTA, and fundraising went well enough that Gupta envisions completing the entire project in a year. At that time, the cafe will open.

View of 40th Street Trolley Portal from Woodland Avenue | Rendering by Andropogon, courtesy of University City District

View of 40th Street Trolley Portal from Woodland Avenue | Rendering by Andropogon, courtesy of University City District

UCD’s plans are similar in a sense to two other pedestrian plazas that neighborhood organizations backed, Baltimore Crossing at 48th and Baltimore and Woodland Green at 42nd and Woodland. But Andrew Stober, chief of staff for Deputy Mayor of Transportation and Utilities Rina Cutler, likens the trolley portal revamp more to the renovations of Dilworth Plaza or the also-UCD-championed Porch at the 30th Street Station.

“This is about taking an existing, unutilized plaza and reinvigorating it,” says Stober. “How do we think of transit hubs as places that are more than just places to get on and off of transit?”

Byron Comati, SEPTA director of strategic planning, agrees with Stober, but is quick to point out that both Dilworth Plaza and the porch at 30th Street didn’t have to accommodate open, surface-level rail, something that’s made the 40th Street project tricky. But even with a design aimed to turn the transit portal into a welcoming space meant to lure pedestrians, construction won’t touch the tracks. That has mostly to do with general trolley performance and maintenance, but it also factors in the portal’s safety record: it’s said to have never had a single fatality. “Not that any of us here at SEPTA can remember,” says Comati. “We have trolleys that travel at reasonably slow speeds. [But] SEPTA can still have an incident where if something is not a fatality, it’s still a concern, and we’re very mindful of that.” The portal’s daily ridership is 3,800, according to SEPTA, with 1,416 trolley trips per day.

View of 40th Street Trolley Portal from Baltimore Avenue | Rendering by Andropogon, courtesy of University City District

View of 40th Street Trolley Portal from Baltimore Avenue | Rendering by Andropogon, courtesy of University City District

The project was awarded $200,000 in City capital budget funds, $800,000 from PennDOT’s Multimodal Fund, $60,000 from the state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources along with $300,000 from the William Penn Foundation among about $560,000 in additional philanthropic and private sources. UCD has raised $19,000 from community members who have purchased pavers and plaques to cover additional costs. That fundraising initiative continues.

About the author

Cassie Owens is a native Philadelphian (Soul group of choice? Stylistics. Cheesesteak of choice? Max's) who has written for Next City, Philadelphia City Paper, the Jewish Daily Forward and other publications. You can catch her on Twitter at @cassieowens.



8 Comments


  1. Thank you, Cassie. Very nice story. Nice to see the area beautified even more…

  2. “The portal’s daily ridership is 3,800, according to SEPTA, with 1,416 trolley trips per day.” That doesn’t seem correct. Only 3800?

  3. $560 million, cool!

  4. Why is no one asking or answering the most important question – noise? The trolleys are horrendously loud screeching banshees. Who is going to want to spend time, outside, in a “meadow” environment when there’s a screaming metal hulk going by every 5 minutes. Are they going to lube the tracks to make it quieter? If not then that cafe is going to have a very small sit in crowd unless they soundproof the hell out of it.

  5. Is it 3800 waiting in that area for a trolly that need something to do while they wait or is is 3800 passing through the portal? I would think only a few hundred actually get on/off at that stop and that neighborhood already has a huge park an about 10 cafe type locations.

    There are already tree planing areas, can’t they add a few flower boxes and benches then invest that money where it is more needed?

  6. About a year or so ago there was a plan floating around with retail spaces included such as a coffee shop. Has that idea been abandoned?

  7. This seems a bit silly to me, accommodating the greeny trend without wisdom. The “concrete oasis” is, even though clean, full of rats! How many more will there be to infest grassy beds that will provide them with lots of burrows. The shelter as it exists, is minimal. If it is such a busy point, and so busy, then there should be a building, duh, enclosing the platforms, containing the noise. A nice brick building could provide safe harbor, classic elegance, shelter, noise abatement, and perhaps make it easier to reduce the rat infestation. The streetcars can come and go through gateways. The roof could be green or whatever. Any kind of shelter would be welcome, and something simple could be erected over the existing concrete. Why not be really trendy and make the center of it a performance space for artsy type groups to put on performances punctuated by trolleys? How urban would that be? Just what foundations like.

Leave a Reply

Comment moderation is enabled, no need to resubmit any comments posted.

Recent Posts
The Rise, Fall, & Revival Of North Broad's Opera Palace

The Rise, Fall, & Revival Of North Broad’s Opera Palace

June 14, 2018  |  Vantage

Rob McClung takes us on a journey through the turbulent history and present reawakening of the mighty Metropolitan Opera House at Broad and Poplar > more

A Brief History Of Race & Contested Space In West Philly

A Brief History Of Race & Contested Space In West Philly

June 11, 2018  |  Vantage

Mariam Williams dives deep into the social evolution of Malcolm X Park to unearth the history of race and economics within a neighborhood space > more

Italian Market Project Puts Fresh Eyes On A Philly Staple

Italian Market Project Puts Fresh Eyes On A Philly Staple

June 8, 2018  |  Vantage

The Italian Market Project mixes a walking tour with Philly-accented theater in a fun, immersive experience. Mickey Herr has the details > more

Taking History To The Streets With Preservation Activism

Taking History To The Streets With Preservation Activism

June 6, 2018  |  Soapbox

Ali Roseberry-Polier discusses civil rights history, selective public memory, and why she created an historical marker for a Black female activist who challenged segregation in 19th century Philadelphia > more

A Buzzy New Beginning For Poth Brewing Company

A Buzzy New Beginning For Poth Brewing Company

June 4, 2018  |  Last Light

Before renovations begin, Michael Bixler takes us inside the remains of Poth Brewing Company with this photo essay > more

One Smart Cookie: When Keebler Called Philly Home

One Smart Cookie: When Keebler Called Philly Home

June 1, 2018  |  Harry K's Encyclopedia

Girl Scout cookies: another city first! Harry K. gives a whirlwind history of America's favorite cake and cracker maker, Philly's own Keebler-Weyl Baking Company > more