SEPTA Serious On Preservation Of Shawmont Station

 

Shawmont Station in 2013 | Mike Szilagyi photo

Shawmont Station in 2013 | Mike Szilagyi photo

About the author

Stephen Currall recently received his BA in history from Arcadia University. Before beginning doctoral studies, he is pursuing his interest in local history, specifically just how Philadelphians engage their vibrant past. Besides skimming through 18th century letters, Steve is also interested in music and travel.

Send a message!



4 Comments


  1. To preserve Shawmont station, a viable user such as a professional office must be quickly found and leased to justify its 1M renovation. It is a great idea as long as we find a professional office user to fill the space.

  2. Historic preservation without use preservation is a hollow, superficial victory. Shawmont needs to be reactivated as a station. An office use is fine too, but reopen that station please. The Norristown line is getting busier all the time and the parking lots are overflowing at the two closest stations, Miquon and Ivy Ridge.

  3. Through research of SEPTA’s archives combined with various State & local records & collections (maps & deeds), it has been determined that the Station building was the vacation home of Phhiladelphia’s Nathan Nathans, Esq., who built it in 1826. Henry Croskey, Lumber and Railroad Merchant, was the owner who acquired it in 1835 and turned it into a station. He established it as a mixed-use building between the railroad and Schuylkill Navigation Company and sold it to the Railroad in 1857. It is the oldest railroad-owned building in the world.

  4. My wife would kill me if I bought this as a vacation home right next to the clickety clack of train tracks!

    HOpefully this will be restored into professional offices and hopefully they will be fully leased to those who like the clickety clack of trains zomming by.

Leave a Reply

Comment moderation is enabled, no need to resubmit any comments posted.

Recent Posts
A Century Of Public Events On The Benjamin Franklin Parkway

A Century Of Public Events On The Benjamin Franklin Parkway

October 23, 2018  |  Last Light

Patrick Glennon takes a look at big public shindigs and the making of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway through rarely seen photographs from the Historical Society of Pennsylvania > more

Cherry Street Pier Raises The Bar For Dynamic Public Space

Cherry Street Pier Raises The Bar For Dynamic Public Space

October 19, 2018  |  Buzz

Cherry Street Pier is officially open for business. The 99-year-old maritime warehouse blends a public park with artist studios, food vendors, a beer garden, and incredible views of the Delaware River. Michael Bixler gives us a look inside > more

Defending Philly History From 3,000 Miles Away

Defending Philly History From 3,000 Miles Away

October 17, 2018  |  Vantage

Joshua Bevan knew he had to act after discovering the architectural beauty of Belmont. From his home in San Francisco he mobilized to nominate a neighborhood landmark for historic designation. In this essay Bevan describes his journey between the Bay Area and Philly to protect the McGaw Mansion > more

Design Coalition Aims To Bridge The Old-New Divide

Design Coalition Aims To Bridge The Old-New Divide

October 12, 2018  |  Walk the Walk

Move over Miami, the Philadelphia Design District is getting ready for some time in the spotlight. The coalition of gallery owners, artisans, and tech startups want to transform Old City into a hive of contemporary design, while preserving the neighborhood's historic character. Joe Brin takes a look inside the idea with co-founder Eugenie Perret > more

Germantown Boys & Girls Club Compromise Brings Peace To Penn Street

Germantown Boys & Girls Club Compromise Brings Peace To Penn Street

October 9, 2018  |  News

Owners of Germantown Boys and Girls Club reach an agreement with preservationists after two years of heated debate. Starr Herr-Cardillo has the news > more

Shakespeare & Co. Brings Old Bank Back To Life

Shakespeare & Co. Brings Old Bank Back To Life

October 4, 2018  |  Buzz

Manhattan-based bookstore and café revives an old banking storefront in Rittenhouse Square. Michael Bixler takes a look > more