Variations On A Theme: Phillies Lowering Skyline-Blocking Tower

 

Theme Tower, circa 2006 (with Comcast Center and Murano under construction) | Photo: Bradley Maule

Theme Tower, circa 2006 (with Comcast Center and Murano under construction) | Photo: Bradley Maule

When Veterans Stadium came crashing down in dramatic fashion on a Sunday morning in 2004, it took with it the memories of the 1980 World Series title, Randall Cunningham’s TD toss to Jimmie Giles after getting drilled by Carl Banks on Monday Night Football, and the pseudo memories of various Dead/Floyd/Stones shows. It did not, however, take with it the Theme Tower, that awful skyline-blocking thing in The Vet’s parking lot. Thankfully, Phillies beat writer Matt Gelb reports for the Inquirer, that’s about to change.

With the Phillies’ 2013 home campaign wrapped up, the team is changing its configuration from a 157′, three-sided tower to a 115′, two-sided tower, effectively creating a super-billboard for passersby on I-76. That ought to solve the problem of the Theme Tower’s interference with the skyline shots the national networks use during the bump to and from commercial break, and award a long-deserved, unimpeded skyline view from those Citizens Bank Park seats behind home plate. But since they’re only lowering it—not removing it—it’ll stand to block the views of others.

Win some, lose some—just ask this year’s Phils.

About the author

Bradley Maule is co-editor of the Hidden City Daily and the creator of Philly Skyline. He's a native of Tyrone, Pennsylvania, and he's hung his hat in Shippensburg, Germantown, G-Ho, Fishtown, Portland OR, Brewerytown, and now Mt. Airy. He just can't get into Twitter, but he's way into Instagram @mauleofamerica.



5 Comments


  1. Just for the record, and really not important at all, but Pink Floyd actually only played the vet once, in 1988. In 1987, they played JFK (On September 19th), which was notable because it was the last time they ever performed Echoes. They switched to Shine On You Crazy Diamond afterwards, because they completely forgot the lyrics!

  2. Very glad to hear this… hopefully the eyesore Holiday Inn is next

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