@hiddencityphila + @igers_philly = #igers_philly_hiddencity

 

Kids especially love the Ruins at High Battery installation at Fort Mifflin | Instagram photo: Nathaniel Popkin, @hiddencityphila

Kids especially love the Ruins at High Battery installation at Fort Mifflin | Instagram photo: Nathaniel Popkin, @hiddencityphila

With three weeks left to go in the Hidden City Festival 2013, we’ve got three weeks left to hand out some passes and prizes. Effective immediately, and just in time for the Thursday–Sunday circuit, we’re happy to announce a tag team Instagram contest with @igers_philly.

Over the course of the next three weeks, we encourage you to take photos at festival sites and post them to Instagram with the hashtag #igers_philly_hiddencity. (We’re still using #hiddencityfestival too.) The contest is actually three contests—one for each week—running Thursday through Monday, at which time a panel consisting of the editors of Hidden City and @igers_philly will select a winner.

instameet

For the first two weeks, the winner receives a Day Pass to the festival ($20 value, access to all nine sites, which are definitely accessible in a single day via car or bicycle). Then, when the festival is over, the grand prize of a Hidden City membership, t-shirt, and hard hat goes to the #igers_philly_hiddencity champion. Each week, we’ll make a post of that week’s best photos here on the Daily.

So there it is. Be sure to follow @hiddencityphila and @igers_philly on Instagram, and get a head start this Saturday at the Instameet at Germantown Town Hall. (Please note that regular admission applies.) As an added bonus, Germantown’s Juneteenth celebration is happening just up the block, and Germantown High School, which officially closes its doors next Friday, is just across the street from Germantown Town Hall.

There’s lots to see in historic Germantown, and lots to win with @hiddencityphila and @igers_philly. Plan ahead and buy your passes HERE.

About the author

Bradley Maule is co-editor of the Hidden City Daily and the creator of Philly Skyline. He's a native of Tyrone, Pennsylvania, and he's hung his hat in Shippensburg, Germantown, G-Ho, Fishtown, Portland OR, Brewerytown, and now Mt. Airy. He just can't get into Twitter, but he's way into Instagram @mauleofamerica.



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