24 Hours Later At 22nd & Market

 

Fire Commissioner Lloyd Ayers and Police Chief Charles Ramsey talk at the scene of yesterday's building collapse | Photo: Bradley Maule

Fire Commissioner Lloyd Ayers and Police Chief Charles Ramsey talk at the scene of yesterday’s building collapse | Photo: Bradley Maule

A building owned by a pornographer who associates with legendary slumlords being demolished by a contractor with a known criminal record, signed off by an architect affiliated with other noted slumlords . . . what could possibly go wrong?

Six people are dead because a demolition crew was shoddily pulling down a four-story building next to a one-story building—one that was active and full of employees and shoppers. As it turns out, four stories worth of falling concrete, bricks, and wood are heavy enough to puncture the roof of a building below it.

The Youtube video posted by Kevin2200 shows the care the demo crew took in taking down Hoagie City’s façade and sign. Which is to say: none. In the video, normal traffic passes by and the entrance to the 22nd Street trolley station—which I’ve used several times in the past week, often walking widely around the demolition site—is completely open and not secured.

A day later, search and rescue continues, an investigation has already been launched, lawsuits are surely being prepared, and a Rally fund has been started to assist the six families in the painful memorial services they must prepare.

And still further demolition remains. The back wall of Hoagie City, facing Ludlow Street and the Mütter Museum, still stands, open to the elements. Accuweather calls for “heavy rain and a thunderstorm” tonight, and a “thundershower” tomorrow.

* * *

Ed. note: Hidden City contributor Christian Suchecki was on the scene at 22nd & Market this afternoon. Click any of the images below to launch the gallery.

About the author

Bradley Maule is co-editor of the Hidden City Daily and the creator of Philly Skyline. He's a native of Tyrone, Pennsylvania, and he's hung his hat in Shippensburg, Germantown, G-Ho, Fishtown, Portland OR, Brewerytown, and now Mt. Airy. He just can't get into Twitter, but he's way into Instagram @mauleofamerica.



Leave a Reply

Comment moderation is enabled, no need to resubmit any comments posted.

Recent Posts
Pride And Prejudice: Honor LGBT History With Rizzo Statue Removal

Pride And Prejudice: Honor LGBT History With Rizzo Statue Removal

June 21, 2018  |  Soapbox

For Pride Month, Ali Roseberry-Polier takes a look at Frank Rizzo's legacy of aggression towards Philly's LGBT community and why his divisive monument should be moved > more

Docomomo PHL To Host

Docomomo PHL To Host “Wake” For Modernist Store

June 18, 2018  |  News

Modernist architecture advocacy group will hold a demonstration to protest Philadelphia's historic preservation crisis. Michael Bixler has the details > more

The Rise, Fall, & Revival Of North Broad's Opera Palace

The Rise, Fall, & Revival Of North Broad’s Opera Palace

June 14, 2018  |  Vantage

Rob McClung takes us on a journey through the turbulent history and present reawakening of the mighty Metropolitan Opera House at Broad and Poplar > more

A Brief History Of Race & Contested Space In West Philly

A Brief History Of Race & Contested Space In West Philly

June 11, 2018  |  Vantage

Mariam Williams dives deep into the social evolution of Malcolm X Park to unearth the history of race and economics within a neighborhood space > more

Italian Market Project Puts Fresh Eyes On A Philly Staple

Italian Market Project Puts Fresh Eyes On A Philly Staple

June 8, 2018  |  Vantage

The Italian Market Project mixes a walking tour with Philly-accented theater in a fun, immersive experience. Mickey Herr has the details > more

Taking History To The Streets With Preservation Activism

Taking History To The Streets With Preservation Activism

June 6, 2018  |  Soapbox

Ali Roseberry-Polier discusses civil rights history, selective public memory, and why she created an historical marker for a Black female activist who challenged segregation in 19th century Philadelphia > more