Stories In The Ash

 

ABC Auto, which burned on Saturday | Photo: Peter Woodall

ABC Auto, which burned on Saturday | Photo: Peter Woodall

The 19th century warehouse at 1815 Sedgely Avenue, which burned on Saturday, was one of the last remnants of a massive industrial zone that extended northwest from the Pennsylvania Railroad tracks west of Broad Street in North Philadelphia. So many of these old manufacturing buildings have been lost, it seems to us, because of their proximity to the railroad, which isolated them from the fabric of the surrounding neighborhoods. This building, where E.J. Rickler manufactured soap at the turn of the century, was the original home of the Weidemann Machine Company, which was established in Philadelphia in 1916. The company apparently developed the “world’s first turret punch press” according to its promotional materials in 1955. A small step in the march of technology to be sure, but one that had to be made by someone nonetheless.

The building had most recently been occupied by ABC Auto, which remanufactured front wheel drive axles as well as other auto parts. ABC operated there into the 1990s and appeared to have done little more than shut off the lights, leaving the artifacts of manufacturing in situ.

Peter Woodall is the co-editor of Hidden City Daily. He is a graduate of the UC Berkeley School of Journalism, and a former newspaper reporter with the Biloxi Sun Herald and the Sacramento Bee. He worked as a producer for Radio Times with Marty Moss-Coane and wrote a column about neighborhood bars for PhiladelphiaWeekly.com.



4 Comments


  1. Danggggg. How did no scrappers get in there and clean that place out? They would have made a fortune.

  2. I’m wondering if this is the same huge building that I look at at the end of my block daily. It’s fenced off now but I see it at 19th and Lehigh. I’ve recently seen some official looking folks inside the fence at 19th and Lehigh too. Are they about to make this building into the latest too expensive for anyone in the neighborhood to afford condos? It’s way close to the Swampoodle forgotten blocks neighborhood.

Leave a Reply

Comment moderation is enabled, no need to resubmit any comments posted.

Recent Posts
Italian-American Heritage & Industrial Landmarks Go Under Review For Historic Designation Recommendation

Italian-American Heritage & Industrial Landmarks Go Under Review For Historic Designation Recommendation

June 17, 2019  |  News

Starr Herr-Cardillo has this roundup of local register nominations on the agenda at the June meeting of the Philadelphia Historical Commission's Designation Committee > more

Homeowners Pay The Price When New Construction Damages Neighboring Rows

Homeowners Pay The Price When New Construction Damages Neighboring Rows

June 14, 2019  |  News

Owners of row houses are left with little recourse when demolition and new construction causes structural damage to their homes. Starr Herr-Cardillo takes a look at a growing citywide problem > more

The Origins Of The Eagles On The Market Street Bridge

The Origins Of The Eagles On The Market Street Bridge

June 13, 2019  |  Vantage

Ed Duffy rides the rails from Manhattan to Philadelphia to give us the backstory on the granite eagle sculptures that stand guard over the Schuylkill River > more

<em>Tonight Is Forever</em> Honors Stonewall Riots & Philly LGBT Activism History

Tonight Is Forever Honors Stonewall Riots & Philly LGBT Activism History

June 11, 2019  |  News

A new art installation at William Way LGBT Community Center connects local and national moments in gay liberation history. Ali Roseberry-Polier takes a look > more

New Exhibit Invites Visitors Inside The Life Of Row Houses

New Exhibit Invites Visitors Inside The Life Of Row Houses

June 6, 2019  |  News

"Rowhouse Workshop," an exhibition devoted to the culture of Philly’s most iconic residential form, opens on Friday, June 7 at Cherry Street Pier. Michael Bixler has the details > more

Introducing The

Introducing The “Mayor of Girard Avenue,” Larry Kane

June 4, 2019  |  Vantage

In Francisville, a sharp spike in real estate development has triggered displacement and a shift in demographics. But Larry Kane, a longtime resident and fixture of the neighborhood, isn't going anywhere. Richelle Kota introduces us to one of North Philly's most beloved residents > more