Take Us Mobile: Hidden City Partners With Google’s Field Trip

 

Field-Trip-Logo

We’re pleased to announce that our place-based news reports and building histories are now available through Google’s new Field Trip mobile app. We’re Field Trip’s first non-profit journalism partner in Philadelphia.

Field Trip is a guide to marvelous, hidden, and unique things in the urban landscape. (It also provides conventional reviews of restaurants and stores.) The app runs in the background on your phone, and when you get close to something interesting, it pops up a card with details about the location. No click is required. If you are connected to a headset or a Bluetooth device, it can read the info aloud.

“Google’s New Hyper-Local City Guide Is a Real Trip,” wrote WIRED reviewer Michael Calore in September. Hidden City recommendations and events will appear on Field Trip alongside similar stories from sites like Zagat, Food Network, Thrillist, Eater, Cool Hunting, Inhabitat, Remodelista, Atlas Obscura, and Flavorpill.

Field Trip is the first project of Niantic Labs, the Google team headed by Google Earth creator John Hanke. Niantic’s sophomore effort, a massive multiplayer game called Ingress, is generating a ton of buzz. If you’re a gamer, definitely check it out or follow along as clues are revealed online at Niantic Project.

Download the Field Trip app or get more information at http://support.google.com/fieldtrip. You can share your favorite finds on Google+ or use the hashtag #FieldTripApp. We look forward to hearing about your favorite Philly field trips!

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About the author

Hidden City Daily contributing editor Meredith Broussard has written for Harper's, The Washington Post, The San Francisco Chronicle, Slate.com, The Chicago Reader, The Philadelphia City Paper, and Philadelphia magazine. A former features editor at the Philadelphia Inquirer, she teaches creative writing at the University of Pennsylvania. Meredith holds a BA from Harvard University and an MFA from Columbia University. Visit her website at meredithbroussard.com.



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