Wawa Hoagie Day on Independence Mall

 

Mayor Michael A. Nutter, City Representative Melanie Johnson, and Howard Stoeckel, President & CEO of Wawa, with Wawa employees at the 2012 Wawa Welcome America Press Announcement. | Photo: Kait Privitera for the City of Philadelphia

Twenty years ago, on June 27, 1992, then-mayor Ed Rendell celebrated the first Wawa Hoagie Day by naming the hoagie Philadelphia’s official sandwich.

This year, Mayor Nutter was in the crowd as Wawa handed out 4.5 tons’ worth of Italian shorti hoagies to celebrate Wawa Hoagie Day and kick off the 2012 Wawa Welcome America! Festival.

Wawa’s Shorti mascot with a patriotic visitor to Wawa Hoagie Day | Photo: Theresa Stigale

It took two hundred Wawa employees to set up and serve the 9,000 pounds of hoagies to the crowd of thousands.

One of thousands of free hoagies served by Wawa volunteers | Photo: Theresa Stigale

This year’s event beneftited the USO and local charities. Featured events included a hoagie building contest between the Pa. National Armed Guard and National Air Guard; a station for writing letters to troops serving abroad; and live music by the USO band.

Opening ceremony by the military troops | Photo: Theresa Stigale

Visit the official website for the Welcome America! festival for the full schedule of fireworks, concerts, events and the Fourth of July parade.

Independence Mall visitors and volunteers await the delivery of fresh hoagies | Photo: Theresa Stigale

About the author

Theresa Stigale was born and raised in Southwest Philly. She earned a B.B.A. from Temple University in 1983. Theresa is a photographer as well as a licensed Pennsylvania Real Estate Broker, developer and instructor. In the past ten years, she has documented the loft conversion projects that she and her partners have completed in Philadelphia, from stately old abandoned warehouses covered with graffiti to vintage factories, some still active with manufacturing. Visit her web site at TheresaStigalePhotography.com.

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