Progress At 19th Street Baptist

 

Photo: Sean Maxwell

Last Saturday, April 28th, the masonry materials supply company LimeWorks.us, which markets an environmentally benign hydraulic lime mortar to be used in place of Portland cement, led a small workshop with some volunteers at the 19th Street Baptist Church in South Philadelphia in an effort to stabilize a section of the church’s compromised north wall. The volunteer team was made up of church members, a masonry student from Thaddeus Stevens College of Technology, and the student’s father.

Photo: Sean Maxwell

Photo: Sean Maxwell

Photo: Sean Maxwell

After raking the joints and cleaning the area, the crew replaced the bedding mortar using the company’s Ecologic Mortar, which is made up of natural hydraulic lime. The mortar is meant to be an accurate reflection of the building’s original mortar.

According to Sean Maxwell of LimeWorks.us, the team successfully repaired two sections of the failing mortar on the north facing wall of the serpentine stone church. Maxwell says the company donated all the materials for the workshop and left a few bags for Reverend Vince Smith and his team of trained volunteers to continue making the most urgently needed repair.

“Following the workshop it became quite obvious that a master plan is needed to fully address all the repair needs inside and out,” says Maxwell.

About the author

Nathaniel Popkin is co-editor of the Hidden City Daily and author of three books of non-fiction, including the forthcoming Philadelphia: Finding the Hidden City (Temple Press) and a novel, Lion and Leopard (The Head and the Hand Press). He is the senior writer of the film documentary "Philadelphia: The Great Experiment."



2 Comments


  1. I say ‘canonize’ these gents. At least it’s something positive. Frank Furness
    is smiling!

  2. Really great news!

Trackbacks

  1. Yes We Can Save The Frank Furness 19th Street Baptist Church

Leave a Reply

Comment moderation is enabled, no need to resubmit any comments posted.

Recent Posts
Tax Credit Turnabout Triggers Protest At New Aloft Hotel

Tax Credit Turnabout Triggers Protest At New Aloft Hotel

October 23, 2017  |  News

No restaurant, no jobs, no explanation. Community activist groups want to know why $33 million in Federal and State tax credits and grants were awarded to renovate the Liberty Title Building for new Aloft hotel. GroJLart has the story > more

Willis Hale's Bold Beginnings On The Delaware River

Willis Hale’s Bold Beginnings On The Delaware River

October 20, 2017  |  The Shadow Knows

The work of Willis G. Hale, the mind behind the much-adored Divine Lorraine and the frankly fussy Hale Building, is enjoying a renaissance as of late. The Victorian architect's penchant for brazen facades can be traced back to a warehouse on the Delaware River, demolished in the 1960s to make way for I-95. The Shadow has the backstory > more

On 40th Street, New Life For A Long-Hidden Furness

On 40th Street, New Life For A Long-Hidden Furness

October 18, 2017  |  Vantage

What's it take to restore this early Furness? Hidden City talks to developer Tom Lussenhop about the tear-down disaster ongoing across the city and his plans for the former West Philadelphia Institute > more

Praise And Protest At Historical Commission Meeting

Praise And Protest At Historical Commission Meeting

October 17, 2017  |  News

Applause and anger filled the room at the monthly Historical Commission meeting on Friday. GroJLart has the details > more

The True Center Of The City Revealed

The True Center Of The City Revealed

October 13, 2017  |  Harry K's Encyclopedia

City Hall may be the "heart" of Philadelphia, but an unassuming corner in North Philly is the true center of the city. Harry K. explores the evolution of Penn's greene country towne and how Philadelphia has a history of being the center of attention > more

LIGHTS! MUSIC! ACTION! Historic Lansdowne Theater Poised For A Comeback

LIGHTS! MUSIC! ACTION! Historic Lansdowne Theater Poised For A Comeback

October 11, 2017  |  Vantage

After 30 years' slumber, Lansdowne's sumptuous Art Deco movie palace is ready to wake up, and rouse Main Street too, with music and community spirit. Ben Leech has the story > more