Philly Bike Share, Please

inhabitat.com/nyc

  • Rachel Aland argues for a bike share system for Philadelphia at Next American City. “Philadelphia, with its density, grid layout, flat topography, large population of university students and existing population of bike commuters (first in the country out of the top 10 biggest cities) is a prime candidate for bike share. So why hasn’t it happened yet?”
  • Flying Kite looks at one of Northern Liberties’ few remaining vacant lots—at North 2nd & Brown streets—on which developer Chris Richetti would like to construct 10 apartment units.
About the author

Stephen Currall recently received his BA in history from Arcadia University. Before beginning doctoral studies, he is pursuing his interest in local history, specifically just how Philadelphians engage their vibrant past. Besides skimming through 18th century letters, Steve is also interested in music and travel.

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4 Comments


  1. Bike commuting represent 1.6% of all commuters! We’ve already lost lanes of traffic to these spoiled brats. Philadelphia also has one of the oldest populations of residents. So don’t expect too many 50 plus residents to clap their hands for bike sharing. Not one cent of public funds for another precious bike project.

  2. Forgive me if I don’t shed a tear for some lost lanes of traffic.

    Cyclists have been busy remaking the city that motorists have been unmaking for decades. First we will take away your travel lanes, soon you will lose your blighting surface parking, then your terrible, street-life killing first floor garages. Maybe eventually you won’t be able to park in the center of Broad Street anymore, let alone in the bike lanes on Sunday.

    And we will take this all from you, and in the process we will be healthier than you, we will spend less money than you, we will spend the money we save in the city, and just by riding around we will be making the city a safer, better, more active and interesting place.

    So run. Run and hide.

    (written by a bike commuter who actually prefers the subway)

    • Thank you for validating all my points. You are as selfish as every other fascist cyclist who believes the future belongs to him because he has a smaller carbon footprint than me.

      • Fascist? Yikes. I’m actually a democratic socialist, and jackboots don’t really work well on pedals (unless you get a special attachment, but jesus only people who ride fixies would get something like that).

        But yeah the future is mine, not necessarily because of a smaller carbon footprint (my iPhone was shipped from China at enormous cost just like everyone else’s) but because I’ll probably live longer and healthier than somebody who spends a ton of time sitting, especially if we get things like dedicated, protected bike lanes.

        Is there a spot in the city where the stosstruppen are compelling you to get on a bike at the point of a gun? I know that there’s a Barcade in Fishtown now but things can’t possibly be THAT bad. You should try it, though. It can be fun and invigorating, but it’s usually a hassle, like most commuting. Bikes, not Barcade.

        I really wouldn’t recommend Barcade.

        And anyway, even a fascist government should want to subsidize something as efficacious as cycling, right? After all, automobile subsidies are ENORMOUSLY expensive, not just in dollars but in a mind-boggling array of externalities that have been unfolding for decades and are still unfolding (just look around this poor, battered city). Bike subsidies are pretty cheap, and, in addition to promoting superior health outcomes, will also go a long way toward eventually knitting back together a wonderful city completely garbaged by the national automobile slum.

        Consider the Vine Street Expressway. That thing had to be built, taxpayer funding and grants had to be secured, tenants had to be evicted and land seized, all in the name of powerful interests. Spoiled brats. Consider the sheer immense cost of the thing, the engineering feats involved, the tons of earth moved, the acres of Philadelphia destroyed forever just to shave minutes off your commute.

        Now consider the Spruce Street bike lane. Consider the bike lanes in aggregate all over town, as piddling and insignificant as they are. Which do you really think has been worse for the city?

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