Scrambled? Another Contest

October 26, 2011 |  by  |  Possible City  |  , ,

Cedric Price's egg theory of cities

The late architect Cedric Price boiled down urban history to the progressive egg theory: cities, depending on the era of their formation, are either boiled (ancient, walled), fried (a center surrounded by successive rings), or scrambled (contemporary). Price’s theory doesn’t hold for Philadelphia. Says landscape architect Dilip da Cunha, “Philadelphia never grew from the center out, in successive rings.”

William Penn, of course, had a deliberate plan to create a decentralized, non-walled city (perhaps a carefully prepared mushroom omelet), but that plan was essentially thrown out upon landing in the New World. When Penn arrived, he found irate settlers living in caves along the Delaware, and no clear sense of where (or how large) his city could be. Penn established a new grid plan to fit the smaller space he was able to acquire. He assumed people would purchase lots along both rivers and the city would grow in toward the center. But most Philadelphians settled along the Delaware and from there the city grew very slowly, like a punctured yoke spreading across the pan.

And simultaneously (more or less), pioneer Philadelphians settled in the Northern Liberties, Germantown, Southwark, and Spring Garden (and in prototype urban enclaves like Burlington, in West Jersey), making the early city really quite a scramble.

All this is to say the egg metaphor doesn’t quite hold up as designed. But what might replace it?

We at Hidden City are in search of a better way to understand Philadelphia’s urban form. And so we turn to you. If the egg theory doesn’t hold, what’s yours? Please mail ideas to editor@hiddencityphila.org. The best, according to our editorial staff, will reward its owner with a Hidden City souvenir hardhat and a Hidden City membership.

And also: keep your eyes out for Stephen Currall’s upcoming historical deconstruction of Philadelphia’s actual shape, a story about the negotiation of religion, commerce, and ethnicity.

About the author

Nathaniel Popkin is co-founder of the Hidden City Daily and author of three books of non-fiction, including Philadelphia: Finding the Hidden City (with Peter Woodall and Joseph E.B. Elliott) and two novels, Everything is Borrowed and Lion and Leopard. He is co-editor of Who Will Speak for America, an anthology forthcoming in June 2018, and the senior writer of the film documentary "Philadelphia: The Great Experiment."



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