Marching North

Street lamps planned for N. Broad St.

  • “Chinatown,” declares the head of its development corporation John Chin, “is beginning to take control of its destiny.” Historically boxed in by the city’s large-scale revitalization efforts, and currently combating the Reading Viaduct Neighborhood Improvement District proposed in City Council by Frank DiCicco, Chinatown is asserting itself, attempting to expand the heart of the community north of Vine. At the center of the expansion: the proposed 265 feet tall Eastern Tower Community Center at 10th & Vine, whichh would be mixed-use.
  • Only twelve months in, Sugarhouse Casino is ready to discuss phase two of its development along the Delaware. Architect Ian Cope’s presentation to commissioners yesterday detailed plans for the city’s sole casino to spread north, connecting with Penn Treaty Park. The addition would include a garage and another gaming floor, adding 1,500 parking spots and almost double gambling space.
  • Manayunk’s second annual EcoArts Festival is this weekend on Main Street. Newsworks talks to Manayunk Development Corporation’s Martha Vidauri, who envisions the two-day event as a necessary start in Manayunk becoming “the greenest district in the greenest city in the United States.”

 

About the author

Stephen Currall recently received his BA in history from Arcadia University. Before beginning doctoral studies, he is pursuing his interest in local history, specifically just how Philadelphians engage their vibrant past. Besides skimming through 18th century letters, Steve is also interested in music and travel.

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1 Comment


  1. Hey, love the sight, and love the Morning Blend. One suggestion: add “Morning Blend” to the title. Otherwise, the titles don’t make sense in RSS feeds.

    And, seriously, PCDC? Do you remember opposing bike lanes because of too much car traffic, but now Chinatown doesn’t use enough cars to justify a parking garage with your new building.

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