Abolitionist’s Dreamland

Letter from the Northeast

Byberry Hall, photo by Jack McCarthy

Efforts are underway to save the home of noted nineteenth-century abolitionist Robert Purvis, located on Mount Vernon Street in the Spring Garden section of Philadelphia. Some of the news coverage of these efforts has indicated that Purvis used the house in his Underground Railroad activities and that it is the last surviving Purvis site. Neither is true. Purvis moved to the Mount Vernon Street home in the 1870s, long after slavery was over.

But there is another, more important extant Purvis site: Byberry Hall. Built by Purvis in 1846 to host community meetings and anti-slavery activities, Byberry Hall is still standing on the grounds of Byberry Friends Meeting in Far Northeast Philadelphia.

Robert Purvis (1810-1898) was one of the nation’s foremost abolitionists and was considered the “President” of the Underground Railroad. A well-known lecturer, writer, and social activist, he was a key figure in the anti-slavery movement in the mid nineteenth century. While living in downtown Philadelphia, Purvis’ abolitionist activities put his life in danger and in 1844 he moved with his family to Byberry Township, then a rural area quite removed from the city. Here he established himself as a gentleman farmer and active member of the community, while still continuing his Underground Railroad activities.

Byberry Meeting, photo by Betsy Manning

Purvis’ home was directly across the street from Byberry Friends Meeting, the local Quaker Meeting which at the time was a center of learning and culture. Beginning with the establishment of Byberry Friends School about 1720, followed by the Byberry Library Company in 1794, and the Byberry Philosophical Society in 1829, local Quakers and area residents were actively engaged in education as well as the study of literature, science, and natural history. Purvis participated in all these activities. He sent his children to Byberry Friends School and was a member of the Library Company and Philosophical Society, giving several lectures at the latter.

At the same time, Purvis was using his Byberry home as a stop on the Underground Railroad. By his own estimate, he helped more than 9,000 slaves escape to the North. In 1846 he built Byberry Hall on land adjacent to the Meeting House for use as a community meeting place. While used mainly for local activities, many famous abolitionists also spoke there, such as Lucretia Mott and William Lloyd Garrison. Through Purvis’ activities, Byberry became an important anti-slavery center. In 1878, with his abolitionist days over, Purvis moved back to the city and took up residence at the Mount Vernon house.

Byberry Meetinghouse, photo by Betsy Manning

While Purvis’ house is long gone, Byberry Hall still stands, as does the 1808 Meeting House and the 1823 School House. Together, they form an impressive group of historic buildings on the Byberry Meeting grounds, a five-acre oasis of open space and history amidst modern housing developments and industrial parks. The second floor of the School House contains the collections of the Byberry Library Company and Philosophical Society and is truly a hidden historical gem. Entering this space, with its extensive library of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century books and its array of nineteenth and early twentieth-century natural history exhibits, is a unique, stepping-back-in-time experience like few others in Philadelphia.

About the author

Jack McCarthy is a certified archivist and longtime Philadelphia area archival/historical consultant. He is currently directing a project for the Historical Society of Pennsylvania focusing on the archival collections of the region’s many small historical institutions. He recently concluded work as consulting archivist and researcher for Going Black: The Legacy of Philly Soul Radio, an audio documentary on the history of Philadelphia Black radio, and served as consulting archivist for the Philadelphia Orchestra's 2012-2013 Leopold Stokowski centennial celebration. Jack has a master’s degree in music history from West Chester University and is particularly interested in the history of Philadelphia music. He is also involved in Northeast Philadelphia history. He is co-founder of the Northeast Philadelphia History Network, founding director of the Northeast Philadelphia Hall of Fame, and president of Friends of Northeast Philadelphia History.

Send a message!


  1. I teach African American History in Philadelphia and had often read that Robert Purvis moved to Byberry where he engaged in abolition and Underground Railroad activities. I had no idea, though, that one of his buildings is still standing. Does it have a historical marker? Are there ever tours? This is really fascinating.

  2. Amy:

    Byberry Hall does not have a historical marker, but the Trustees of Byberry Friends Meeting, who own the building, would like to have a state marker placed there eventually. They will probably do something about it within the next few years.

    For the last 40-some years the building has been leased to a karate studio. While the building is actively used, there are no tours of it offered.

    Jack McCarthy

Leave a Reply

Comment moderation is enabled, no need to resubmit any comments posted.

Recent Posts
New 40th Street Trolley Portal Design Dull On Arrival

New 40th Street Trolley Portal Design Dull On Arrival

March 19, 2018  |  Vantage

University City District's beautification of the 40th Street Trolley Portal was high on concept, but appears to have fumbled on delivery. Contributor Ann de Forest has the full review > more

Confusion And Quibbling At Mayor's Preservation Task Force Meeting

Confusion And Quibbling At Mayor’s Preservation Task Force Meeting

March 15, 2018  |  News

Mayor Kenney's Historic Preservation Task Force convened today following the release of a draft of a summary of summaries on the state of preservation in Philadelphia. Logistical bickering and sticker activities ensued. Starr Herr-Cardillo reports > more

Remembering Philly's 1967 School Walkout & The Attack On Teen Activism

Remembering Philly’s 1967 School Walkout & The Attack On Teen Activism

March 13, 2018  |  Vantage

On the eve of the national student walkout honoring the victims of the Parkland shooting, Michael Bixler takes a look back at November 17, 1967 when teenage activists demonstrating for equal rights became the target of a violent police attack > more

Oscar's Tavern Still Parties Like It's 1972

Oscar’s Tavern Still Parties Like It’s 1972

March 12, 2018  |  The Shadow Knows

The Shadow saddles up to the bar at Oscar's Tavern where the spirit of "Old Philadelphia" is as effervescent as their lagers > more

Back When We Burned Trash On The Delaware River

Back When We Burned Trash On The Delaware River

March 9, 2018  |  Harry K's Encyclopedia

Harry K. takes us on a whirlwind exploration of Philadelphia's notorious garbage problem, starting with the long-gone East Central Incinerator at Penn's Landing and then sailing around the globe before returning to today's trashy situation > more

Historic Freight Station Lives Again At Lincoln Square

Historic Freight Station Lives Again At Lincoln Square

March 7, 2018  |  News

Michael Bixler gives us a peek inside the old PW&B train shed under construction at Broad Street and Washington Avenue. The former freight station is currently being converted into a grocery store, part of the rising mixed-use development Lincoln Square > more