Posts Tagged ‘residential architecture’

Row House: Past And Its Future

Row House: Past And Its Future

June 20, 2017  |  Vantage

Contributor Hilary Jay dives deep into the evolution and politics of contemporary row house design with Interface Studio Architects > more

When Cattle Men Reigned In The West

When Cattle Men Reigned In The West

November 21, 2016  |  Vantage

Livestock, slaughterhouses, and stock cars: these are the sights of West Philadelphia after the Civil War. Contributor Joshua Bevan introduces us to Irish immigrant cattle drover Dennis Smyth, a leading figure of the city's stockyard industry in the late 19th century > more

In Somerton, Suffragists' Vision Lives On

In Somerton, Suffragists’ Vision Lives On

October 27, 2016  |  Vantage

In Northeast Philadelphia, the spirit of the suffrage movement lives on at Cranaleith. The late Victorian home was designed by architect Minerva Parker Nichols for both a family home and a meeting place for women's rights activists during the late 19th century. The property is now home to the Sisters of Mercy and the Cranaleith Spiritual Center. Contributor Sarah Kennedy gives us the tour > more

Minerva Parker Nichols: Architect Of Gender Equality

Minerva Parker Nichols: Architect Of Gender Equality

October 26, 2016  |  Vantage

In this second installment of our three-part series on the life and work of groundbreaking female architect Minerva Parker Nichols we trace the origins and apex of her brief, dynamic career > more

Viva Minerva! Celebrating America's First Independent Female Architect

Viva Minerva! Celebrating America’s First Independent Female Architect

October 25, 2016  |  Vantage

Philadelphia architect Minerva Parker Nichols was the first independent female practitioner in the trade and the first female member of the AIA, earning acclaim in the region and across the country. To celebrate the recent addition of Mill-Rae, a Nichols-designed Victorian home with deep women's suffrage ties, to the National Register of Historic Places we present this first installment in a three-part series to honor her life and work > more