Author Archive

Oscar Beisert

Oscar Beisert is an architectural historian and preservationist activist. The Texas Wend is of both Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. Beisert co-authored The Photography of Henry K. Landis He is mid-level bureaucrat in federal historic preservation, has just finished his second row house conversion/restoration project, and can be found at almost every Wednesday night at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

On Front Street, A Warehouse With A Sacred Past Seeks Salvation

On Front Street, A Warehouse With A Sacred Past Seeks Salvation

March 4, 2015  |  Vantage

Kensington was once home to generations of Presbyterians and their houses of worship peppered the neighborhood. One of the denomination's oldest surviving churches in the area was just put up for sale after being used as a building supply warehouse since the 1950s. Oscar Beisert digs deep into the former lives of Second Associate Presbyterian and unearths a strong case for preservation > more

J.T. Riley Lumberyard Yields To Mixed-Use Development

J.T. Riley Lumberyard Yields To Mixed-Use Development

January 23, 2015  |  News

Big development plans are in motion for the former site of J.T. Riley Lumberyard on East Girard Avenue. A leader of the lumber industry for over a century, the recently closed location in Northern Liberties-Fishtown will soon give way to modern apartments and retail space > more

The Public-Minded Pedestrian Street

The Public-Minded Pedestrian Street

February 13, 2014  |  Vantage

In part two of his two-part series on pedestrian streets, Oscar Beisert takes a look at the kind built on purpose: post-Civil War thoroughfares on foot meant to beautify and improve the city's streetscape > more

Pedestrian Streets: Past, Present, and Future Footways

Pedestrian Streets: Past, Present, and Future Footways

January 30, 2014  |  Vantage

Across Philadelphia, thoroughfares as old as Walnut Street and as new as Martin Luther King Drive lead us where we're going. But, as Oscar Beisert uncovers, tucked in between them and dating back to the time of William Penn are small, pedestrian alleys and courts > more