Author Archive

Bradley Maule

Bradley Maule is co-editor of the Hidden City Daily and the creator of Philly Skyline. He's a native of Tyrone, Pennsylvania, and he's hung his hat in Shippensburg, Germantown, G-Ho, Fishtown, Portland (Oregon), Brewerytown, and now Mt. Airy. He just can't get into Twitter, but he's way into Instagram @mauleofamerica.

And Liberty For All

And Liberty For All

November 27, 2015  |  Last Light

Sure, City Hall has its wee observation deck with its 15-minute window for viewing. And the skyline view from the 33rd floor of the Loews is the worst-kept secret in town. But with its opening at One Liberty Place on Saturday, Philadelphia gets its first grown-up observation deck > more

Sunset In South Philly For The 23, Dawn For The 45

Sunset In South Philly For The 23, Dawn For The 45

November 24, 2015  |  News

SERVICE ALERT: This weekend marks the end of an era for a SEPTA legend. The Route 23, by far the longest and most ridden of SEPTA's city bus lines, will split in two, retaining the 23 on the northern portion and becoming the Route 45 in Center City and South Philadelphia. Brad Maule breaks down the line that's a geographic and cultural cross-section of the city > more

Blue Roof, Green Space, New City

Blue Roof, Green Space, New City

November 9, 2015  |  News

With today's opening of Cira Green, Brandywine Realty Trust adds a splash of green—and blue—to its growing neighborhood uniting Center City and University City. Brad Maule tours Philadelphia's first elevated park > more

Of Monsters And Men: Philadelphia's Rockwells

Of Monsters And Men: Philadelphia’s Rockwells

October 14, 2015  |  Vantage

Philadelphia's Curtis Publishing Company made Norman Rockwell a household name, as the quintessential Americana painter contributed 323 covers to the Saturday Evening Post. But it's his son Peter, who studied at Haverford and PAFA, who's given Philly three of its odder sculptures > more

The Devil Is The Detail

The Devil Is The Detail

July 29, 2015  |  Vantage

"Notorious" Devil's Pool? The most beloved place in the Wissahickon may suffer abuse and indignity every summer, but they are no match for its beauty and physiologic significance. Brad Maule defends the natural landmark > more