Treating The Civil War’s Wounded In West Philly

 

A print presenting a bird's eye view of the Saterlee General Hospital. The center of the medical campus is now roughly the 4400 block of Osage Avenue in West Philadelphia.

A print presenting a bird’s eye view of the Saterlee General Hospital. The center of the medical campus is now roughly the 4400 block of Osage Avenue in West Philadelphia.

  • Writing for the Philly History Blog, Steven Ujifusa revisits the Spruce Hill’s Clark Park during the height of the Civil War, finding there Satterlee General Hospital, that war’s largest military hospital, a temporary city of canvas and wood quickly designed and erected in 1862 by local physician Issac Israel Hayes across 15-acres of still rural West Philadelphia.
  • The Philadelphia Museum of Art has been given five bronze sculptures wrought by the late Cy Twombly, The Inquirer’s Stephan Salisbury reports. Evoking classical Homeric themes, the sculptures will complement the museum’s other Twombly holdings, namely his ten-piece suite, Fifty Days at Ilium (1978). 
  • Local artists have once again collaborated with Next Stop: Democracy to encourage voter turnout by decking out polling places with commissioned posters that furnish the civic spaces “with a feeling of energy, excitement, and joy.” This year the group has expanded the project to include every polling place in Philadelphia. Curbed Philly offers a sneak peek of posters.
  • Travel site The Points Guy ranks the 30 busiest airports in America by quality, using actual data to weigh their relative timeliness, accessibility and amenities. PHL comes in at seven, in large part due to the number of eating options which passengers may chose from. “The downside: Philly scored below-average in flight delays and cancellations.”
About the author

Stephen Currall recently received his BA in history from Arcadia University. Before beginning doctoral studies, he is pursuing his interest in local history, specifically just how Philadelphians engage their vibrant past. Besides skimming through 18th century letters, Steve is also interested in music and travel.

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