Archdiocese Reaches Agreement Of Sale For Historic Fishtown Church

 

St. Laurentius Roman Catholic Church in Fishtown | Photo: Michael Bixler

  • Paper Box Studios developer Leo Voloshin has entered an agreement of sale (contingent upon zoning approval) with the Archdiocese of Philadelphia to purchase the deconsecrated and historic St. Laurentius church in Fishtown. Voloshin tells Jared Brey of PlanPhilly that several elements of the 130-year structure will require considerable repair work before he can redevelop the space into apartments.
  • NewsWorks Tonight host Dave Heller speaks with National Constitutional Center exhibits developer Sarah Winski about its latest feature exhibition “Headed to the White House,” in which visitors are guided through the tortuous process of American democracy—with three of its more transformative elections (1840, 1932, 1968) receiving detailed consideration.  The exhibition opens today and runs through election day.
  • Following repeated cases of lewd and violent behavior along the  Schuylkill River Trail, Councilman Kenyatta Johnson is organizing a trail watch group, reports CBS Philly. “Everyone,” he stressed, “should have the opportunity to come out and enjoy themselves on this trail without fear of getting knocked upside the head.”
About the author

Stephen Currall recently received his BA in history from Arcadia University. Before beginning doctoral studies, he is pursuing his interest in local history, specifically just how Philadelphians engage their vibrant past. Besides skimming through 18th century letters, Steve is also interested in music and travel.

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2 Comments


  1. Archdiocese is smart to sell the church on contingent upon buyer getting zoning approval which is much assured due to strong community support. Were the community to object, developer will walk out of the deal and church will continue to decline. Once buy is closed after zoning approval, problem will be the developer to solve as opposed to the Archdiocese.

  2. What could replace the history and neighborhood characteristic?
    Take a look:http://romanblazicwordsandpictures.blogspot.com/2014/06/fishtowntake-another-look.html

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