Redevelopment Plans To Be Announced For SS United States

January 28, 2016 |  by  |  Buzz  |  ,

 

exteriorssus

It’s been a stormy ride for the USS United States since being laid up at Pier 82 in 1996. Today’s announcement that the ship will be saved from the scrap yard and redeveloped, potentially for a mixed-use retail and restaurant destination in Manhattan, is a positive turn | Photo: Chandra Lampreich

Redevelopment plans are in the works for the SS United States, according to a statement released by SS United States Conservancy today. Details on restoring the 63-year-old luxury liner are forthcoming. An official press conference will be held at the Manhattan Cruise Terminal on February 4th.

“After years of working to rescue and revitalize America’s Flagship, the SS United States, the SS United States Conservancy will host a press conference to announce that it has signed an option agreement with a major redevelopment partner,” says the press release.

“At the announcement, an exciting future for the ship will be revealed that envisions the SS United States again as an iconic symbol of America the world over. An artist rendering of the redeveloped ocean liner will also be unveiled.”

The transatlantic record-breaking ship first hit the seas in 1952 with a capacity to carry 1,928 passengers, including a crew of 900. It was taken out of service in 1969 and has sat moored at Pier 82 in South Philadelphia since 1996. The liner was designed by renowned naval architect and marine engineer William Francis Gibbs.

Efforts to save the ship from the scrap yard have been expensive and arduous. The conservancy pays $60,000 monthly just to maintain the vessel. The redevelopment deal will likely see the ship leave Philadelphia and return to its native port in New York City.

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Step aboard the USS United States with this photo essay by Chandra Lampreich HERE.

About the author

Michael Bixler is a writer, photographer, and managing editor of Hidden City Daily. He is a former arts and entertainment reporter with Mountain Xpress weekly in Asheville, North Carolina and a native of South Carolina. Bixler has a keen interest in adaptive reuse, underappreciated architecture, contemporary literature and art, and forward-thinking dialogue about people and place. mmbixler.tumblr.com

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5 Comments


  1. $60,000 a month……just to park it ……wow! Philadelphia is a fresh water port and the ship still has a lot of rust. All the ships I served on are either razor blades or used for target practice by the Navy and one for scuba diver’s amusement off the Florida Coast. Nice to see a beautiful ship like this is going to be preserved.

    • Even fresh water will rust steel, Jim 🙂 it just does it a bit slower. Glad to see this grand lady being saved from the scrapper.

      Also.. $60,000 a month to berth it? Man i’m in the wrong business.

      • The 60K includes insurance, salaries and fundraising expenses. But about 30K is for the dockage, security, and some maintenance. Still waaaay too much for what is essentially dead storage. I hope the NYC space will be cheaper!

      • Salt water does a faster job of rusting……was my point! Should know seen enough of it and what it can do Shane.

  2. Im happy for the ship but sad for Philly. I had taken a tour on the Delaware river the year before last and was told by the tour guide that the ship was staying in Philly, multipurposed including a casino…i was looking forward to gamblibg on this grand ship! 🙁
    Well, doesn’t matter what I want, does it? I’m just glad they’re not scrapping this beauty. I’ll treasure the pics I took of it during that tour and tell my future grandkids about it 🙂
    I’d also like to take this moment to say how much I just love the Hidden City articles!! Keep up the great work!

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