Historical Commission Hardship Meeting Puts Sloan Mansion One Step Closer To Demolition

 

Sloan 1

The John P. Levy House at 40th and Pine | Photo: Michael Bixler

The Historical Commission’s Hardship Committee voted this afternoon, on a potentially precedent-setting ruling, to clear the way for the immediate demolition of the Samuel Sloan-designed mansion at 40th and Pine Streets. The Committee’s recommendation goes before the full Commission for vote on January 9, 2015. The mansion is listed on the Philadelphia Historic Register–and therefore protected by law from demolition. However, in May, 2012, the Commission granted the property’s owner, the University of Pennsylvania, economic hardship, allowing them to demolish the building. The latest iteration of plans for the property–of many proposed over the years–is apartments, to be built by Azalea Gardens Partners, LP. Today, the Committee ruled to recommend that Penn doesn’t have to wait for an upcoming appeals court ruling on the case, nor for any other permitting on the property, before taking it down.

At one point in the debate about the ruling Committee member Robert Thomas wondered what might happen, therefore, if the proposed project doesn’t proceed. “What if the project doesn’t go through?” he asked. “What do we have? A vacant lot?”

Thomas’s point led to the stipulation that Penn will have to take care of the property during the year or so before construction begins. However, for preservationists, the ruling is ominous, particularly on the day when it was revealed that the art deco Boyd Theater, in Center City, which the Historical Commission recently ruled could be demolished, might be saved through a new development proposal. Had the previous owner of the Boyd gone through with demolition at the time of the ruling, instead of waiting to be sure his proposed project was feasible, the theater’s latest potential resurrection would be moot.

It has been a long, complicated saga for the John P. Levy House at 40th and Pine. As Hidden City co-editor Peter Woodall reported in detail in 2012, the University of Pennsylvania and their partner developers sought to demolish the West Philly Italianate mansion after a 2007 proposal to preserve it as part of a hotel tower was rejected by neighbors.

Speaking on behalf of Penn–which is responsible for the care and upkeep of the vacant building, costing an estimated $30,000 a year–Attorney Mathew McClure maintained that the building’s “continued presence in the area is a blight” and that demolition should be an option with or without an approved permit to build. “After zoning litigation and appeals run their course we believe we should be able to proceed with demolition,” said McClure.

The Commission approved McClure and Penn’s recommendation of the removal of the condition.

Up for consideration but ultimately not approved was the condition that the building not be demolished before litigation to reverse demolition approval goes before the Commonwealth Court on February 9th, effectively leaving the building vulnerable to being razed before the court case.

Woodland Terrace homeowners’ attorney and attendees advocated for keeping the condition in place, expressing both the historic value of the Sloan building, as well as the negative precedent that will be set for fast-tracking future demolition of historic properties in West Philadelphia. The Commission disagreed, stating that the John P. Levy House–currently on the city’s Register–no longer has historic value due to it’s many non-historic additions. “The building has been compromised,” said Commission member Dominique Hawkins. “There have been so many changes that it is inappropriate being on the city’s Register.”

 

About the author

Michael Bixler is a writer, photographer, and managing editor of Hidden City Daily. He is a former arts and entertainment reporter with Mountain Xpress weekly in Asheville, North Carolina and a native of South Carolina. Bixler has a keen interest in adaptive reuse, underappreciated architecture, contemporary literature and art, and forward-thinking dialogue about people and place. mmbixler.tumblr.com

Send a message!



5 Comments


  1. This proposed project is not a dorm as reported. It is a real estate development with market rate apartments provided by a private company.The property is situated on a block that is already comprised of apartment dwellings. Being a penn student is not a condition of living there as would define a penn dorm. As a private development it will generate tax revenue for the city. It will create new jobs. it will attract new residents to 40th street, who can support local small businesses.

    The property was once a mansion. But as reported the reader may think it still fits that description. In fact, it stopped bring a private resdience more than five decades ago. It had been nuisance property while operating as a nursing home of sorts until the owners were criminally investigated for their lack following procedures with patients.

  2. Can anybody explain what happened to the proposal to preserve the mansion while developing the site, as described in this article?:

    http://www.westphillylocal.com/2013/11/26/historic-mansion-stays-as-lawsuit-winds-on-new-plan-offered-for-embattled-property-at-40th-and-pine/

  3. That strategy still stands as an option. A five story apartment building would be added to the lot and include the retention of the badly damaged former nursing home. However, The Woodland Terrace Homeowners Association rejected any development strategy that included a five story apartment building, even one that in its scheme preserved and rehabilitated the badly damaged former nursing home. They are challenging the required zoning change that would allow for five stories. The developer can build “as of right” up to four stories, so this an additional story requires a variance. Woodland Terrace Homeowners Assoication is challenging this variance in court, which is one of the reasons there has been little progress in any directio over the last few months.

  4. Woodland Terrance Homeowners Association rejected a preservation proposal of the mansion which would be incorporated into a 5 story enclave. Judge Ceisler recommended Commonwealth Court reject their appeal in a personal note to the judges sitting in the court. The building is in deplorable condition and needs to come down. Once done, then the dispute is whether to build at 5 stories or do a build by right at 4 stories which would sidetrack any challenges to the proposal and allow construction to start right away. The developer can look for another by right site and build accordingly.

Leave a Reply

Comment moderation is enabled, no need to resubmit any comments posted.

Recent Posts
Without Remediation, Diamond In The Rough A Risky Play

Without Remediation, Diamond In The Rough A Risky Play

September 22, 2017  |  News

How safe is safe enough? Environmental researcher Coryn Wolk explores the potential public health risks at a youth baseball field built on top of an industrial alloy production site surrounded by an oil refining complex > more

Wayne Junction Moves Forward With Revitalization

Wayne Junction Moves Forward With Revitalization

September 20, 2017  |  News

Developer Ken Weinstein unveils transit-oriented development plans for Wayne Junction district. GroJLart has the story > more

Inside Northeast Philly's Temple Of Ryerss

Inside Northeast Philly’s Temple Of Ryerss

September 19, 2017  |  Harry K's Encyclopedia

Harry K. takes us on a fall field trip to the Ryerss Mansion, an eccentric, little-known house museum in the Great Northeast > more

Unlisted Philadelphia: Locust Theatre

Unlisted Philadelphia: Locust Theatre

September 14, 2017  |  Unlisted Philadelphia

Ben Leech spotlights unique and significant buildings not listed on the Philadelphia Register of Historic Places with his architectural illustration series, Unlisted Philadelphia. In this installment, a marvelous movie house in West Philly > more

Monument Lab: A City-Wide Art Museum That Asks Us To

Monument Lab: A City-Wide Art Museum That Asks Us To “Leave Fingerprints”

September 13, 2017  |  Vantage

We ought to write our own history, say the organizers of Monument Lab, who launch their multi-week public art and civic introspection festival today in the wake of Charlottesville, Dallas, and Durham. Nathaniel Popkin catches up with Monument Lab founder Paul Farber, who asks us all, "What is an appropriate monument for Philadelphia today?" > more

An Original Keeps It Classy On Chestnut Street

An Original Keeps It Classy On Chestnut Street

September 12, 2017  |  The Shadow Knows

From furniture and furnace manufacturing to a 1980s video arcade, 1606 Chestnut Street has kept busy for 127 years. The Shadow has the details on this Center City standout > more