Emma F-C’s Philadelphia Map: A Cut Above

 

Before & after: Emma Fried-Cassorla with her quintessentially Philadelphian creation | Images via @phillylovenotes

Before & after: Emma Fried-Cassorla with her quintessentially Philadelphian creation | Images via @phillylovenotes

For the past two years, Emma Fried-Cassorla has opened her heart to her hometown. Philly Love Notes began with her quest to find new ways to love her native city, and it shrewdly evolved into a blog whose content is generated by other people fulfilling her quest. (This writer contributed Love Note #200—to the PSFS Building—and Daily co-editor Nathaniel Popkin’s, Love Note #104, honored the American sycamore tree.)

Mt Airy in paper | Paper cut by Emma Fried-Cassorla

Mt Airy in paper | Paper cut by Emma Fried-Cassorla

In the past six months, she’s decompressed from her various responsibilities—including a day job as the communications manager for the Delaware River Waterfront Corporation—by making teeny tiny cuts with an X-acto knife. Her love for Philadelphia became geographic, as she made postcard-sized paper cuts of neighborhoods for people quick enough to raise their hand when she asked who wanted one. (I earned myself a 4″ x 6″ Mt Airy.)

Developing a passion for the craft to match her ambition of creating a major prize and major work of art, she decided to create a paper cut of the entire city. Now complete after six weeks of work, she’s giving it away.

Fried-Cassorla’s extremely delicate paper cut of Philadelphia’s massive system of streets, railways, and parks measures three feet by three-and-a-half feet (3′ x 3.5′), so be ready to take those measurements to your local lumber yard. In the map’s creation, largely spent in the coworking space at Indy Hall, she went through 85 X-acto blades in an estimated 250 hours of work, and, she adds, “one bottle of Art in the Age’s Sage to celebrate.”

Now complete, she’s giving it away in a contest. To enter? All you need to do is create your own love note—to your favorite building, park, sculpture, neighborhood hero… whatever inspires you. [And what do you know, in doing so, she’s building a stock of content.)

Fried-Cassorla plans on drawing the winner in two weeks, Monday, June 23rd, from a hat full of the names of contest entries—printed and cut by hand with an X-acto. For details on how to win this unique work of art, visit her blog HERE.

Then, after you’ve won it, be sure to show up at the next #whyilovephilly party, which she’s co-hosting with her employers to preview their latest creation, Spruce Street Harbor Park, a reimagining of the Penn’s Landing Marina into a popup park with a restaurant, bar, and lots and lots of hammocks on the Delaware Riverfront. Buy a $10 ticket to the #whyilovephilly party HERE.

About the author

Bradley Maule is co-editor of the Hidden City Daily and the creator of Philly Skyline. He's a native of Tyrone, Pennsylvania, and he's hung his hat in Shippensburg, Germantown, G-Ho, Fishtown, Portland OR, Brewerytown, and now Mt. Airy. He just can't get into Twitter, but he's way into Instagram @mauleofamerica.



Leave a Reply

Comment moderation is enabled, no need to resubmit any comments posted.

Recent Posts
Reaching For The Heavens At Cret's Tower Of Chimes

Reaching For The Heavens At Cret’s Tower Of Chimes

May 26, 2017  |  Vantage

Turn a corner in Philadelphia and you will eventually run into a building or bridge designed by Paul Phillipe Cret. Celebrated for his broad, arched infrastructure and Neoclassical landmarks, not much is discussed of his cemetery architecture. Contributor Brian Horne takes a trip out to Montgomery County where a 172-foot tower designed by Cret sends a memorial park reaching towards the sky > more

Rediscovering The Dead Fleet Of The Delaware River

Rediscovering The Dead Fleet Of The Delaware River

May 23, 2017  |  Vantage

The ships of the "Dead Fleet" at Pier 78 rise at low tide from their watery graves in the Delaware River. It's a curious sight, recalling a time when the riverbanks thrummed with a booming maritime industry. Philadelphia shipping historian Robert McNulty takes us on a salty voyage to uncover the backstory of South Philadelphia's ghost ship graveyard > more

Building A Better Future With Bright Common

Building A Better Future With Bright Common

May 19, 2017  |  Vantage

Hidden City editor Michael Bixler catches up with sustainable architect Jeremy Avellino to talk climate change, deep energy retrofits, and the power of passive house building. > more

Restoration Project Gives New Life To Ben Franklin's Grave

Restoration Project Gives New Life To Ben Franklin’s Grave

May 17, 2017  |  News

Benjamin Franklin's tombstone gets some desperately needed TLC. Tyler Horst has the story > more

Summoning The Spirit Of A Victorian Masterpiece

Summoning The Spirit Of A Victorian Masterpiece

May 15, 2017  |  The Shadow Knows

Gone, but not forgotten. The Shadow channels the ghost of the Henry J. Morton Guild House, a beautiful Victorian hall designed by famed Philadelphia architects Wilson Brothers & Company > more

The Making (And Marketing) Of The Modern Gayborhood

The Making (And Marketing) Of The Modern Gayborhood

May 12, 2017  |  Vantage

Contributor Kelson Northeimer takes a look at the history of the Gayborhood and its cultural transformation through lifestyle marketing and gentrification > more