Were Philly’s KOZs DOA?

 

Plan Philly

Plan Philly

  • The Philadelphia Real Estate Blog tells of the genesis of Russell H. Conwell’s Baptist Temple on North Broad Street, and the eponymous university which grew from it. Designed by Thomas F. Lonsdale, the Temple held its first service in March 1891, after a $250K construction project. The University would go on to utilize the building for some time after acquiring it from the original congregation in 1974, but by 1998, was claiming hardship to the Historical Commission and seeking to demolish it. “The move touched off a firestorm of protest even louder than that currently swirling around the current and similar Boyd Theater case. Many Temple alumni considered the move akin to a knife through the university’s heart – and ultimately, the university administration heard their pleas to save it.” The Temple Performing Arts Center opened in 2010 and hosts an array of events, most recently Friday’s TEDxPhiladelphia innovation conference.
  • Thomas Jefferson University Hospital will lease the former Chops steakhouse building at 7th & Walnut, reports the Philadelphia Business Journal. President David McQuaid says the agreement will allow Jefferson to expand upon its “ambulatory footprint, consistent with the national trend for growth in the outpatient market.” Senior reporter John George remarks on the convergence of Pennsylvania Hospital towards Jefferson’s traditional ‘turf,’ as “some Jefferson officials even refer to the Penn Medicine Washington Square Building as ‘Penn Medicine at Jefferson.’”
About the author

Stephen Currall recently received his BA in history from Arcadia University. Before beginning doctoral studies, he is pursuing his interest in local history, specifically just how Philadelphians engage their vibrant past. Besides skimming through 18th century letters, Steve is also interested in music and travel.

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