SEPTA Serious On Preservation Of Shawmont Station

 

Shawmont Station in 2013 | Mike Szilagyi photo

Shawmont Station in 2013 | Mike Szilagyi photo

About the author

Stephen Currall recently received his BA in history from Arcadia University. Before beginning doctoral studies, he is pursuing his interest in local history, specifically just how Philadelphians engage their vibrant past. Besides skimming through 18th century letters, Steve is also interested in music and travel.

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4 Comments


  1. To preserve Shawmont station, a viable user such as a professional office must be quickly found and leased to justify its 1M renovation. It is a great idea as long as we find a professional office user to fill the space.

  2. Historic preservation without use preservation is a hollow, superficial victory. Shawmont needs to be reactivated as a station. An office use is fine too, but reopen that station please. The Norristown line is getting busier all the time and the parking lots are overflowing at the two closest stations, Miquon and Ivy Ridge.

  3. Through research of SEPTA’s archives combined with various State & local records & collections (maps & deeds), it has been determined that the Station building was the vacation home of Phhiladelphia’s Nathan Nathans, Esq., who built it in 1826. Henry Croskey, Lumber and Railroad Merchant, was the owner who acquired it in 1835 and turned it into a station. He established it as a mixed-use building between the railroad and Schuylkill Navigation Company and sold it to the Railroad in 1857. It is the oldest railroad-owned building in the world.

  4. My wife would kill me if I bought this as a vacation home right next to the clickety clack of train tracks!

    HOpefully this will be restored into professional offices and hopefully they will be fully leased to those who like the clickety clack of trains zomming by.

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