Cultivating Creativity In South Kensington

October 31, 2013 |  by  |  Morning Blend

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At Front & Oxford with Gabe Canuso and Greg Hill | Photo by Neal Santos for City Paper

At Front & Oxford with Gabe Canuso and Greg Hill | Photo by Neal Santos for City Paper

  • City Paper looks at the impressive efforts underway at Front & Oxford, where the Oxford Mills project will incentivize the units’ rental by various educators, perhaps seeding the South Kensington area with the creative types already credited for the creation of an increasing distinct Philadelphia identity.
  • Plan Philly reports on the latest community meeting in preparation of this February’s Lower North District plan. Many of the participants at the Columbia North YMCA accused the City of avoiding an active discussion with the neighborhoods of the Lower North; it is a reputation that David Fecteau hopes to change for the Planning Commission, encouraging anyone with questions or concerns to contact him during the planning process. The interactive planning that did take place centered on some goals: more parks and shopping options, preventing further subdivision, and how best to redevelop the old industrial blocks on American Street and on Ridge Avenue.
  • Two years after demolishing the Philly Diner at 39th & Walnut, the University of Pennsylvania has now settled on how to use the space: a six-story, LEED gold building will be constructed for the “staff displaced by the recent creation of the Ronald O Perelman Center for Political Science and Economics at 36th & Walnut,” says Naked Philly.
  • Technically Philly looks at the Streets Department’s $3.4 million Juniata Park operations center expected to be ready next fall. Lead traffic engineer Richard Montanez explains that there’s now no alternative than building smarter. The center will serve to monitor and control traffic patterns with about a third of the city’s traffic lights in its direct control.
About the author

Stephen Currall recently received his BA in history from Arcadia University. Before beginning doctoral studies, he is pursuing his interest in local history, specifically just how Philadelphians engage their vibrant past. Besides skimming through 18th century letters, Steve is also interested in music and travel.

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