650′ Tower Announced For West Philly, Cira Centre Expansion

 

The Cira Centre complex | Rendering: Brandywine Realty, Pelli Clarke Pelli

The Cira Centre complex, FMC Tower far left | Rendering: Brandywine Realty, Pelli Clarke Pelli

The Philadelphia architecture and development community’s 2013 Halloween treat comes from Brandywine Realty, who today announced the FMC Tower at Cira Centre South. The 47-story, 650′ tower will be the sixth-tallest building in the city, dwarfing the original Cira Centre and the Evo (née Grove at Cira Centre South), currently under construction.

FMC Tower at Cira Centre South | Rendering: Brandywine Realty and Pelli Clarke Pelli

FMC Tower at Cira Centre South | Rendering: Brandywine Realty and Pelli Clarke Pelli

The FMC Corporation, a specialty chemical company, will relocate their headquarters from the BNY Mellon Center at 18th & Market to the new tower, the latest phase in Brandywine’s Cira Centre development on the west bank of the Schuylkill River. With a 16-year lease, FMC will occupy 253,000 sq ft of the 830,000 sq ft building which also includes 260 luxury apartment suites and four floors of office space for the University of Pennsylvania. The LEED Silver building, at 30th & Walnut, will be directly across the street from the main ramp to Penn Park, a re-melding of the two properties once owned by the USPS.

The design for the tower comes from Pelli Clarke Pelli, architects of the original Cira Centre tower on the north side of 30th Street Station, in collaboration with BLT Architects. The Pelli towers bookend the Cira Centre development, which also includes Erdy McHenry’s Evo, the Cira Garage, and the renovation of the old Post Office into Cira Square, occupied by the IRS.

Groundbreaking for the FMC Tower is expected mid-2014, with opening anticipated for 2016.

About the author

Bradley Maule is co-editor of the Hidden City Daily and the creator of Philly Skyline. He's a native of Tyrone, Pennsylvania, and he's hung his hat in Shippensburg, Germantown, G-Ho, Fishtown, Portland OR, Brewerytown, and now Mt. Airy. He just can't get into Twitter, but he's way into Instagram @mauleofamerica.



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