Design For Drexel’s Perelman Plaza Takes Shape (Updated 8/29)

 

Perelman Plaza, Drexel University | Image: Andropogon Associates

Perelman Plaza, Drexel University | Image: Andropogon Associates



Updated, 3:35PM

Drexel University’s campus will be significantly enhanced with green space and gathering areas along the new Perelman Plaza, according to new design renderings released this month. Demolition of the existing landscape has begun, as of Thursday morning, August 29. The new space, under design development at the landscape architecture firm Andropogon Associates, links principal Drexel buildings old and new, including the mixed use Chestnut Square and the LeBow College of Business buildings presently being completed.

Work on Perelman Plaza begins | Photo: Hidden City Daily

Work on Perelman Plaza begins | Photo: Hidden City Daily

The new plaza will visually and physically connect fragmented spaces at the center of campus to afford the university an expansive central campus gathering area for the first time in Drexel history.

Perelman Plaza site plan, Drexel University | Image: Andropogon Associates

Perelman Plaza site plan, Drexel University | Image: Andropogon Associates


4 Comments


  1. \”central campus gathering area for the first time in Drexel history\”… Isn\’t that what The Quad was?

  2. So funny. I graduated from Drexel in 2008. I am pretty sure they renovated that area to its current state during my tenure. No one liked it because the angles just didn\’t make any sense. Less than 10 years later, they are redoing their mistake.

  3. I agree, the angles were not good, and those color changing lights were….

    The fountain in the quad was ridiculous and expensive, and that was probably removed in less than 5 years.

  4. Though I only ever walked through the space a few times it always struck me as a wasted, anti-social space that was defined by who Drexel wanted to keep away. There were cuts in the curbs to deter skateboarders, bumps in the benches to keep folks from lying down and seating that could not be moved. Sure other places employ the same techniques, but there was little to offset the ugliness. The walkways were ill-conceived and made little sense in relation to buildings or foot traffic. Even the plantings were execrable! Social engineering doesn\’t have to look like that.

Leave a Reply

Comment moderation is enabled, no need to resubmit any comments posted.

Recent Posts
In Belmont, The Making Of A

In Belmont, The Making Of A “City Of Villas”

January 20, 2017  |  Vantage

Contributor Joshua Bevan takes us on an architectural tour of Belmont, where the origins and growth of the neighborhood can still be read in its distinctive homes > more

Shaping A New Urban Crossroads At 33rd And Chestnut

Shaping A New Urban Crossroads At 33rd And Chestnut

January 18, 2017  |  Vantage

Contributor Ann de Forest stands at the confluence of Penn and Drexel's campuses where a once listless intersection is being redefined with energy, connectivity, and strategic design > more

The Best Seats In The City, Ban Be Damned

The Best Seats In The City, Ban Be Damned

January 16, 2017  |  Buzz

Last week Friends of Rittenhouse Square and PPR announced a ban from sitting on the interior walls of the park. Two days later Mayor Jim Kenney reversed the rule. We take a look at life along the balustrades in these old photos > more

Capturing The Ghosts Of Demolition

Capturing The Ghosts Of Demolition

January 13, 2017  |  Last Light

The demolition composites of photographer Andrew Evans beguile the eye with ghostly images of a city passing through time. Evans presents his newest additions to the series and explains his process with this photo essay > more

Pencoyd Bridge Reopens In Manayunk, As Redevelopment Of Foundry Site Begins

Pencoyd Bridge Reopens In Manayunk, As Redevelopment Of Foundry Site Begins

January 11, 2017  |  Vantage

The deserted industrial site of Pencoyd Iron Works is next on a growing list of riverside redevelopment along the Schuylkill. Contributor Mick Ricereto takes us deep inside the history of the family-owned foundry and farmland that dates back to the city's founding > more

Urban Fantasy: The Carousel Maker Of Broad & Erie

Urban Fantasy: The Carousel Maker Of Broad & Erie

January 10, 2017  |  The Shadow Knows

Traditional carousel design may have roots in Europe, but "Philadelphia Style" took the amusement ride to a whole new level. The Shadow takes a stroll down Germantown Avenue where the G.A. Dentzel Carousel Company became the gold standard in animal kingdom merry-go-rounds > more