Design For Drexel’s Perelman Plaza Takes Shape (Updated 8/29)

 

Perelman Plaza, Drexel University | Image: Andropogon Associates

Perelman Plaza, Drexel University | Image: Andropogon Associates



Updated, 3:35PM

Drexel University’s campus will be significantly enhanced with green space and gathering areas along the new Perelman Plaza, according to new design renderings released this month. Demolition of the existing landscape has begun, as of Thursday morning, August 29. The new space, under design development at the landscape architecture firm Andropogon Associates, links principal Drexel buildings old and new, including the mixed use Chestnut Square and the LeBow College of Business buildings presently being completed.

Work on Perelman Plaza begins | Photo: Hidden City Daily

Work on Perelman Plaza begins | Photo: Hidden City Daily

The new plaza will visually and physically connect fragmented spaces at the center of campus to afford the university an expansive central campus gathering area for the first time in Drexel history.

Perelman Plaza site plan, Drexel University | Image: Andropogon Associates

Perelman Plaza site plan, Drexel University | Image: Andropogon Associates


4 Comments


  1. \”central campus gathering area for the first time in Drexel history\”… Isn\’t that what The Quad was?

  2. So funny. I graduated from Drexel in 2008. I am pretty sure they renovated that area to its current state during my tenure. No one liked it because the angles just didn\’t make any sense. Less than 10 years later, they are redoing their mistake.

  3. I agree, the angles were not good, and those color changing lights were….

    The fountain in the quad was ridiculous and expensive, and that was probably removed in less than 5 years.

  4. Though I only ever walked through the space a few times it always struck me as a wasted, anti-social space that was defined by who Drexel wanted to keep away. There were cuts in the curbs to deter skateboarders, bumps in the benches to keep folks from lying down and seating that could not be moved. Sure other places employ the same techniques, but there was little to offset the ugliness. The walkways were ill-conceived and made little sense in relation to buildings or foot traffic. Even the plantings were execrable! Social engineering doesn\’t have to look like that.

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