Collapse At Salvation Army Store At 22nd & Market; Story Updated (2:09PM)

 

2:09PM update

One person has been confirmed dead. Two more are possibly still in the rubble.

1:10 update

Hidden City writer Christopher Mote reports: “The building that held Hoagie City and the two adult entertainment venues immediately to the east, Les Gals and the Book Bin II, were all slated for demolition back in February.The Book Bin and Les Gals started coming down in April. All three properties are owned by Richard Basciano, who owns all of the properties on the south side of the 2100 block of Market except for the Salvation Army building and the fire station. He also owns the site of the Forum Theatre on the 2200 block, which was also demolished in February.”

12:45 update

Fire commissioner Ayers | Photo: Bradley Maule

Fire commissioner Ayers | Photo: Bradley Maule

Mayor Nutter speaking to press | Photo: Bradley Maule

Mayor Nutter speaking to press | Photo: Bradley Maule

Mayor Nutter says 12 people have been transported to hospitals. Closed off area for the afternoon between Walnut & the Parkway, 18th & Schuylkill River. Salvation Army thrift store was open while active demolition was going on at Hoagie City. Griffin Campbell appears to be the demolition contractor.

Rescue workers are carefully clearing debris in case any other people are trapped.

Police chief Charles Ramsey and fire commissioner Lloyd Ayers on the scene of the building collapse | Photo: Bradley Maule

Police chief Charles Ramsey and fire commissioner Lloyd Ayers on the scene of the building collapse | Photo: Bradley Maule

12:05 update

Police Chief Charles Ramsey and fire Commissioner Lloyd Ayers are now on the scene; rescue efforts have slowed. Workers are chainsawing through floor boards of the collapsed building. Representatives of the Red Cross are here with water and workers from Trader Joe’s across the streets have brought over a crate of bananas for the crews working.

The 2100 block of Market Street before demolition | Photo: Howard Haas

The 2100 block of Market Street before demolition | Photo: Howard Haas

Salvation Army collapse | Photo: Bradley Maule

Salvation Army collapse | Photo: Bradley Maule

11:40 update

The shell of the Salvation Army store building is all that remains after the building collapsed this morning–probably a result of the demolition work of the Hoagie City building next door and the other buildings on the block. The buildings along 22nd Street collapsed in on themselves. At the four story Hoagie City, all that remains is the back wall along Ludlow Street, facing the Mütter Museum.

There are about five ambulances waiting and people digging through the rubble. It’s not clear yet if the people trapped were shopping in the thrift store or workers involved in the demolition.

A gurney appears now to be pulling someone from the rubble.

The collapse blew out the front windows of the Salvation Army Store; glass is scattered on Market Street.

Photo: Googlemaps

Photo: Googlemaps

11:30AM

The Salvation Army thrift store at 22nd and Market has collapsed, trapping some 10 people inside, some part of a demolition crew and some shopping at the thrift store. First responders were on the scene almost immediately.

Hidden City will have further information as the story develops.

About the author

Bradley Maule is co-editor of the Hidden City Daily and the creator of Philly Skyline. He's a native of Tyrone, Pennsylvania, and he's hung his hat in Shippensburg, Germantown, G-Ho, Fishtown, Portland OR, Brewerytown, and now Mt. Airy. He just can't get into Twitter, but he's way into Instagram @mauleofamerica.



4 Comments


  1. City paper is reporting that the building is owned by a shell company owned by the Benn family not Basiano. Not doubting Brad, just curious. Great coverage as always.

    • Gersil N. Kay, IESNA, AIA/HRC

      Several years ago, a so-called “preservation” architect designed a high rise on the Delaware waterfront WITHOUT ANY PERMISSIONS, and got away with it. Clever lawyers for greedy developers seem to be able to circumvent any weak government regulations. Wait for that poorly built structure to fail down, too.

      Practical education in SAFE design, and extending the life, value and usefulness of existing structures is urgently needed for everyone at every level. Demolition contractors should be experienced structural engineers, and not sellers of valuable architectural components taken from unnecessarily demolished property.

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