Where To Put Philly’s Bike Share Stations?

 

photo: David Maialetti, for philly.com

photo: David Maialetti, for philly.com

  • Inga Saffron describes the difficult task ahead in choosing the initial 120 stations for Philadelphia’s bike share program. “With [our city’s] colonial-era street grid and skimpy sidewalks, we already have a fierce competition for primacy among pedestrians, motorists, and regular bicyclists,” she argues. The city has already provided strict guidelines: no sidewalks, no parking garages, no public squares, leaving private property (like Comcast’s plaza) and the perimeter of museums as the most likely options. The Mayor’s office is also promising the public its chance to vet the proposed stations prior to installation.
  • All are invited to Fairhill Square, at 4th & Lehigh on Tuesday, May 14, from 4PM-7PM for the rededication of Rafael Ferrer’s beloved and whimsical El Gran Teatro de la Luna. “The sculpture, installed in 1982, has been in storage since the 1999 demolition of the utility building upon which it was originally installed,” says a press release. “With support from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Association for Public Art, the sculpture has now been restored by the artist and has returned to the community for which it was created.”
  • As part of National Travel & Tourism Week, the Greater Philadelphia Tourism Marketing Corporation (GPTMC) has released its annual report, The Evolution of a Destination & Its Marketing, exploring some of the major changes in the city’s marketability in recent years. Some facts to share: its website is the most visited of the top ten largest American cities; the percentage of hotel visitors citing “individual leisure” for their stay has more than doubled since 1997; and last year, regional tourism generated some $622 million in state and local taxes. To see the full PDF report, click HERE.
About the author

Stephen Currall recently received his BA in history from Arcadia University. Before beginning doctoral studies, he is pursuing his interest in local history, specifically just how Philadelphians engage their vibrant past. Besides skimming through 18th century letters, Steve is also interested in music and travel.

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