Penn Graduates Suggest Ways To Unload School Building Inventory

 

Plan Philly

Plan Philly

  • By the conclusion of this school year, 23 school buildings will be permanently closed, heaping more empty buildings—nine now still vacant—onto the shoulders of the City and School District. Plan Philly shares the details of a recent independent report, “New Life for Old Schools,” from a group of Penn planning graduates. For one, they advise that the City think realistically about their chances for redevelopment, and organizing the holdings into three tiers, reflecting those chances. Hopefully, all could be unloaded before Mayor Nutter leaves office in three years. For a copy of the report, click HERE.
About the author

Stephen Currall recently received his BA in history from Arcadia University. Before beginning doctoral studies, he is pursuing his interest in local history, specifically just how Philadelphians engage their vibrant past. Besides skimming through 18th century letters, Steve is also interested in music and travel.

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2 Comments


  1. How about simply listing them on the MLS? Do we need a committee to figure that one out? The School District could do this, say instead of basically abandoning them and letting looters stip everything of value out of them. But hey, when you’ve got a budget of $2.6 Billion, what are a few buildings here and there. Let me go ahead and pay 300% more in taxes each year on my home so 2000 or so vice-principals and other administrators can sit on their rumps all day.

  2. Problem is the school district is not composed of Donald Trump types who maximize building usage for profit. They move at the speed of molasses to dispose of surplus property to a point where nobody will want the properties and they will decay and be demo by neglect. Very dangerous places for scavengers to run around to steal the copper.

    What they need to do is to select a real estate company to take charge of and market the properties for sale to interested persons like is done for any homeowner selling property. Some scholls will sell fast to interested parties who have already scoped them out. Right now, the few have already been scoped out and are ready to be purchased on the spot once the district gives the ok to sell them. We need the district to move at the speed of light to take advantage of development offers.

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