Historic Preservationist Offers New Views Along North Philly Tracks

 

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  • Over at Eyes on the Street, Brett Sturm tells of his studio project for Penn’s graduate program in historic preservation from last year,in which he developed a detailed inventory of all that Amtrak’s 7-mile North Philadelphia span has to visually offer to the millions who zip through this scene of economic devastation each year. “My goal was to communicate the legible, historic elements of North Philly’s railroad landscape in a way which would inspire passengers to notice, understand, and ultimately appreciate a view most people consider banal, gloomy, or just plain ugly,” says Strum. The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society has recently added the Corridor to its list of the next generation of civic landscapes that it will seek to beautify in the coming decade-and-a-half.
  • The Inquirer reports that from August through September, the Academy of Music will undergo another set of renovations, costing  $600,000-$800,000. The front stairs—dating from the late 1940s—will be replaced, but with only half the current number of handrails, making it appear lighter. “Inside, plaster on the parquet level will be repaired. A new lounge with a video screen and audio will be created in the lower level,” and “a new digital control system will be installed to help the existing system run more efficiently.”
  • Tomorrow evening, from 6:30-8:30 at Festival Pier, the Delaware River Waterfront Corporation (DRWC) will hold a public meeting concerning the Spring Garden Street Connector Project. The RBA Group has been contracted “to design streetscape improvements to Spring Garden Street between Columbus Boulevard/N. Delaware Avenue and 2nd Street, including a new lighting and public art installation under the I-95 overpass and Spring Garden transit stops,” says the DRWC in a press release. For more information, click HERE.
About the author

Stephen Currall recently received his BA in history from Arcadia University. Before beginning doctoral studies, he is pursuing his interest in local history, specifically just how Philadelphians engage their vibrant past. Besides skimming through 18th century letters, Steve is also interested in music and travel.

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