The Other McIlhenny Mansion

 

Photo: Peter Woodall

Photo: Peter Woodall

Long before there was a McIlhenny Mansion, there was Park Gate. Before he moved to Rittenhouse Square, Henry Plumer McIlhenny lived in his family’s home on Lincoln Drive, where Wayne Avenue and Johnson Street converge and where Germantown and Mount Airy blur.

Photo: Peter Woodall

Photo: Peter Woodall

Photo: Peter Woodall

Photo: Peter Woodall

Photo: Peter Woodall

Photo: Peter Woodall

Built in 1910 by John D. McIlhenny, Henry’s father, the home is called Park Gate for the twin stone gates marking this section of the city’s entrance to Wissahickon Valley Park. McIlhenny sold the house to Fredric Mann after moving to Rittenhouse Square in 1950. The School District of Philadelphia bought it from Mann in 1954, and two years later built the Lingelbach Elementary School on the grounds next to the house.

Photo: Peter Woodall

Photo: Peter Woodall

Photo: Peter Woodall

Photo: Peter Woodall

Photo: Peter Woodall

Photo: Peter Woodall

Nearly sixty years later, the School District has no need for Park Gate. Two years ago, Patrick Moran filed an application to place it on the Philadelphia Register of Historic Places; the Historical Commission requested revisions. Currently, the house is vacant and in significant disrepair.

Photo: Peter Woodall

Photo: Peter Woodall

Photo: Peter Woodall

Photo: Peter Woodall

Photo: Peter Woodall

Photo: Peter Woodall

Peter Woodall is the co-editor of Hidden City Daily. He is a graduate of the UC Berkeley School of Journalism, and a former newspaper reporter with the Biloxi Sun Herald and the Sacramento Bee. He worked as a producer for Radio Times with Marty Moss-Coane and wrote a column about neighborhood bars for PhiladelphiaWeekly.com.



6 Comments


  1. the house is vulnerable to ongoing despoiling. As recently as two years ago, the stair case railings were intact except for the newel post and the decorative finials where the railing turned at each landing.

  2. Good God – How horrible – One of the finest mansion houses in Philadelphia brought to a state of ruin by – once again – the city.

  3. This building needs to come down as it is a firetrap and an accident ready to happen. There is nobody out there who wants it and who has the money to restore it to live there.

  4. I really doubt a building of semi-fireproof construction and without anybody in it can be a “firetrap”.

    It is historic and a gorgeous building within city limits. Shortsighted people like you would have torn down the Colosseum and Parthenon decades ago citing they were “an accident ready to happen” and the world would be devoid of any relics of our past. History is what makes philadelphia, and it needs to be preserved.

    Also, what is the harm is allowing it to become a ruin? When a derelic building like this is torn down for a new structure it is a shame but at least understandable. There is no reason to demolish a building to replace it with a vacant lot. Now that is a waste and a shame.

  5. Don’t worry the City of Philadelphia will do nothing.
    The man that signed the Declaration of Independence owned a giant home in West oak lane.
    James Morrison Estate was torn down and the City of Philadelphia built a low income housing project on the site.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Morris_(financier)

  6. Or when they personally demolished the Benjamin Rush House in the 1960s.

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