New Philly Food Co-ops Searching For Place

 

Originally the home of Belmont Trust Company, Mariposa opened here in 2012 | Photo courtesy of Mariposa Food Co-op

Originally the home of Belmont Trust Company, Mariposa opened here in 2012 | Photo courtesy of Mariposa Food Co-op

Two new food cooperatives—the South Philly Food Co-op and the Kensington Community Food Co-op—are at the crucial stage of selecting storefront locations. In both cases, the process may put two critical co-op goals at odds: the business need for grocery store scale and the community desire for a central location.

Moreover, given the unique dynamics of a cooperative—it must secure enough member-investors before even considering a retail location—the search process can be long and complicated.

At the Garden Tour | Photo courtesy of South Philly Food Co-op

At the Garden Tour | Photo courtesy of South Philly Food Co-op

The South Philly Food Co-op has existed in some form since 2010, growing from a small group of interested South Philly residents to an organization of volunteers and member-owners. Last month, it celebrated reaching its goal of 400 member-owners.

But despite this success, it still has no location to call its own. It remains held together by periodic volunteer meetings and a robust web presence.

This might be disconcerting if it were not anticipated. In fact, the co-op has sequenced each phase of its development based on its current number of members. A real estate committee, which is now selecting at least five locations for the board’s consideration, was not formed until 250 members joined. Construction will not begin until 600 members join.

Jessica Calter, member of the real estate committee, says that the membership-based timeline is a way to organize a process that is inherently unpredictable. Generally, co-ops must solicit members and even banks for funding before guaranteeing the exact location of their store. A co-op thus has to carefully balance expectations with its financial capacity.

“There is a sort of dance that happens between real estate and financing,” says Calter. “You can’t secure the financing until you have a location, but you can’t really get a location until you have a sense of how much money you can legitimately finance. It’s a little bit of a chicken and an egg thing.” (Calter was thus unable to disclose the locations being considered for the South Philly Food Co-op.)

Eggs & butter, brick & mortar: Weavers Way | Photo courtesy of Weavers Way Chestnut Hill

Eggs & butter, brick & mortar: Weavers Way | Photo courtesy of Weavers Way Chestnut Hill

Longstanding co-ops Weavers Way, in Mount Airy and Chestnut Hill, and Mariposa, in West Philadelphia, and have provided consulting support to the two start-ups. Both have demonstrated that today co-ops can fill a market niche between the large supermarkets and the corner store. The area’s most recently opened co-op, CreekSide, in Elkins Park, aimed for this medium-sized scale of operation—and has by and large succeeded. Its space is now the size of an average Trader Joe’s. “Our membership was over 1,000 households right off the bat, so we knew we weren’t just a storefront co-op,” says CreekSide general manager Andy Schloss.

The new co-ops in South Philly and Kensington desire a similar size of operation and to reach that level they are searching outside their boundaries for members. But doing so also may mean compromising the desire for a central location.

“We want something that is fairly central to all of our members,” says Calter. But as the co-op has grown, the center has shifted. “If we were only at 150 members and we got 400 more member on the opposite side of South Philly, that would make things very different.”

From the beginning, CreekSide’s members had a clear goal of locating in the Elkins Park downtown. “For us, because our membership was grown basically around refurbishing the town, our location was somewhat selected,” says Schloss. “The real impetus for building this co-op was to regenerate this town. So we had a good idea of where the location would be.”

Ashlyn Sylvain would like for you to sample the blood oranges | Photo courtesy of CreekSide Co-op

Ashlyn Sylvain would like for you to sample the blood oranges | Photo courtesy of CreekSide Co-op

There were still other locations outside the Elkins Park downtown that feasibility studies suggested were better business options by virtue of visibility and access to traffic, but members decided they weren’t central enough.

“When we started it, people were not in desperate need for a food store,” says Schloss. “They were in desperate need of a community, and a food store is a great community center.”

The organizers of the 315 member Kensington Community Food Co-op are also trying to balance store size, location, and community. Kensington’s membership is more anchored to the neighborhood than SPFC, given its history in Kensington as a food stall at Greensgrow farmers markets. But members are still anxious to know when and where the storefront will be built.

“The number one question that people ask is ‘where’s the store going to be?’” says Peter Frank, KCFC vice president and head of the planning committee. “And we don’t know yet,” he admits. “All we can promise is that it will reliably be in the 19125 zip code, which seems to comfort some people.”

Frank does not think it will be difficult to find a location that is viable as a business and also close to its members. Unlike South Philly, KCFC had a strong sense of its boundaries from the outset. KCFC members are clustered in Fishtown and Kensington with only a few outliers. SPFC’s map shows members scattered from Oregon Avenue to Lombard, and from the Schuylkill to the Delaware.

But from an organizational development perspective, KCFC’s timeline contains almost exactly the same milestones as South Philly’s. This is not accidental. Both organizations are working with Co-op Development Services, a Madison, Wisconsin based consultancy firm for upstart co-ops.

Additionally, the established co-ops like Mariposa and Weavers Way are providing advice and marketing support, and they are even considering a formal support network that could include development of an operations manual.

These kinds of relationships, with organizations like CDS and among the co-ops themselves, are just beginning to develop and are still fairly informal. But regardless of whatever outside support new food co-ops are getting, they still have to contend with their own unique demographics and particular real estate options.

About the author

Alex Vuocolo is a freelance journalist in Philadelphia and its surrounding suburbs. He has written for Next American City and is currently picking up the occasional credit at Delaware County Community College.



2 Comments


  1. Thanks for this great article about Philly co-ops. I’m part of the Philadelphia Area Cooperative Alliance and we’re having a co-op happy hour on Tuesday, April 16th at 5:30 at Fergie’s Pub. All co-operators welcome, it’s free.

    Check out this page for more info: http://www.philadelphia.coop/events/april-16th-co-op-happy-hour/

  2. Hey how about 1100 Vine St? There is a huge space for rent there.

Recent Posts
The Physical & Political Importance Of Goldtex

The Physical & Political Importance Of Goldtex

August 29, 2014  |  Morning Blend

Loft District conversion project finally complete, Manayunk parish to preserve historic church, Temple professor talks ’64 riot, major mixed-use for NoLibs, and previewing Greenfest Philly 2014 > more

Ruminating On Lost Columbia Avenue

Ruminating On Lost Columbia Avenue

August 29, 2014  |  Soapbox

In this third installment in our series, Ethan Wallace examines the long term effects the Columbia Avenue riot has had on this weary section of North Philadelphia. Dubbed an "extinction event", Wallace sifts through the ruins of the once vibrant neighborhood while considering the encroaching development of Temple University's campus and the social unrest happening in Ferguson, Missouri. > more

'Scared Half To Death,' Reporter Says

‘Scared Half To Death,’ Reporter Says

August 28, 2014  |  Vantage

Today marks the 50th anniversary of the Columbia Avenue riot. For the second installment of our series, we have a first person account by Philadelphia Evening Bulletin reporter William Naulty, who was sent in to cover the mayhem on the night of August 28, 1964. > more

Roxborough Sawmill Preserves An Old Industrial Aesthetic

Roxborough Sawmill Preserves An Old Industrial Aesthetic

August 28, 2014  |  Morning Blend

One man's mission to preserve the physical history of industrial Philadelphia, groundbreaking for Rodin Square, street mural requested for Triangles Plaza, the genesis of JFK and 30th Street Station, and this weekend's Made in America Fest > more

Bridesburg, Riverfront Neighborhood Now With Riverfront Access

Bridesburg, Riverfront Neighborhood Now With Riverfront Access

August 28, 2014  |  News

With a land swap championed by Councilman Bobby Henon, Philadelphia gained a win-win scenario with the expansion of Dietz & Watson's facilities and a new riverfront park. Plan Philly's Jared Brey and Hidden City's Brad Maule explore the future park in Bridesburg—the riverfront neighborhood which will finally have access to the riverfront > more

Rodeph Shalom As A Beacon On North Broad

Rodeph Shalom As A Beacon On North Broad

August 27, 2014  |  Morning Blend

A look at the historic Jewish synagogue’s expansion, the economic importance of bike lanes, Suzanne Roberts Theater gets $2.5 million boost, remembering the Philadelphia Trades School, and approvals from the Historical Commission > more