Opening Day Near For Batting Cages At Sixth And Girard

 

Photo: Andrew Baxter

Photo: Andrew Baxter

Baseball people will tell you that the key to becoming an effective hitter is repetition. You have to see and swing at a lot of pitches so the bat will feel lighter and your eyes sharper. But where to do it? If you’re a kid–or a big kid–growing up in Philly, you have to drive to the suburbs to find a batting cage–or play half ball in the alley until your arms fall off.

But just for a few more days. David Gavigan, the baseball lover and entrepreneur behind Everybody Hits, a batting cage presently being completed in a storied building at Sixth and Girard on the edge of the Northern Liberties, says his $100,000 facility will be open by early to mid April. For our first story on this project, click HERE.

“I just want to get open and get people in the batting cages,” says Gavigan, 26, who developed the business plan for Everybody Hits three years ago after a stint in Americorps. He saved up cash and has been working full time to retrofit the building–with its rather storied past as public market and movie house (among other uses)–for three batting cages, each for either baseball or softball. Each cage is capable of delivering pitches at four speeds (for softball: slow pitch, 40, 50, and 60 miles per hour and for baseball: 40, 50, 60, and 70 miles per hour). A round of pitches will cost $2.25 or five rounds for $10. Teams can rent the facility by the hour and individuals will be able to join up as members; in the off-season, Gavigan will offer hitting clinics and coaching, and of course you’ll be able to rent the place for parties.

Photo: Peter Woodall

Photo: Peter Woodall

Gavigan is capitalizing on the Phillies-fed resurgence of baseball here. “It seems like a lot of people are playing baseball right now in Philly,” he says. But more so, he hopes the facility will become a kind of neighborhood gathering spot, as it has been in the past. The layers of time, he says, have been preserved in the renovation. “I’d like to highlight the history,” he says, “it really interests me.”

Photo: Andrew Baxter

Photo: Andrew Baxter

In that case, you’ll be swinging for the “oysters” sign behind the screen.

About the author

Hidden City co-editor Nathaniel Popkin’s latest book is the novel Lion and Leopard (The Head and The Hand Press). He is also the author of Song of the City (Four Walls Eight Windows/Basic Books) and The Possible City (Camino Books). He is senior writer and script editor of the Emmy-winning documentary series “Philadelphia: The Great Experiment” and the fiction review editor of Cleaver Magazine. Popkin's literary criticism appears in the Wall Street Journal, Public Books, The Kenyon Review, and The Millions. He is writer-in-residence of the Athenaeum of Philadelphia.



2 Comments


  1. Besides the obvious for sports enthusiasts who want to practice, etc., this venue could be a great place to stage a different kind of “interactive” event when gathering with friends, family or business-colleagues! Best of luck of Gavigan!

  2. OK, I won’t move to Paris.

Leave a Reply

Comment moderation is enabled, no need to resubmit any comments posted.

 

Recent Posts
The Tale Of Catfish And Waffles

The Tale Of Catfish And Waffles

September 23, 2016  |  Harry K's Encyclopedia

Long before chicken and waffles took hip restaurant menus by storm Philadelphia was famous for the meal's precursor, catfish and waffles, served at inns and taverns on the banks of the Wissahickon Creek and the Schuylkill River. Harry K. sets the table and serves us up a heaping plate of local culinary history > more

Requiem For A Moderne Gem, William Penn Annex Post Office

Requiem For A Moderne Gem, William Penn Annex Post Office

September 22, 2016  |  Vantage

Contributor Ann de Forest delivers a eulogy for the decline of civic architecture and the closing of an iconic post office on East Market Street. > more

Residential Towers To Connect Old City With Northern Liberties

Residential Towers To Connect Old City With Northern Liberties

September 22, 2016  |  Morning Blend

Apartment high-rises planned for East Callowhill, Little Pete’s replacement moves ahead, adverse possession in Fishtown, conserving INHP’s bronze statues, and Clarke defends low-density urban development > more

Planning Commission Scoffs At Bill To Increase Parking Minimums

Planning Commission Scoffs At Bill To Increase Parking Minimums

September 21, 2016  |  Morning Blend

Chilly reception for Blackwell’s parking proposal, Historical Commission committee supportive of designating three Baptist churches, Saint-Gobain gives $700K for LOVE Park, and the artistic filling of some South Philly potholes > more

A Look At Philly's Smallest (Official) Neighborhood

A Look At Philly’s Smallest (Official) Neighborhood

September 20, 2016  |  Morning Blend

Strolling through West Shore, when Philly was addicted to “artificial ice,” Snyder Plaza gets a colorful paint job, and expanded food options on Market > more

Assuming Room Temperature At The City Morgue

Assuming Room Temperature At The City Morgue

September 20, 2016  |  The Shadow Knows

The Shadow gives us a stiff lesson on corpse storage and the history of Philadelphia's morgues > more