$20,061 And We Thank You

December 6, 2012 |  by  |  Buzz  |  ,

 

Photo: Hidden City Daily

Our first fund drive, if we’re to borrow the familiar language of public radio, has ended. We raised $5,000 more than our goal of $15,000 and doubled the number of Hidden City members. If you gave to the campaign, made a comment, spread the word, or rooted us on, we thank you. It really and truly makes a difference.

Please be patient with us as we integrate this new list of members into our member system and send out your perks. If you won a tour or an event (such as a night of bowling), please be in touch so we can help arrange it.

When we hit our $15,000 goal a week ago and decided to try to raise $5,000 more, we told you it would result in ten additional in-depth articles on top of the extended coverage we had already promised. We weren’t making that up. In the coming weeks and months you will see us cover some new territory–both physical and journalistic. We’ll introduce some new writers and photographers and you’ll start to see some old names resurface too. Very soon, we’ll announce a new partnership…and an app!

Soon, we’ll also announce our winter-spring set of tours and events leading to the 2013 Hidden City Festival.

It’s all coming.

If you wished to give to the campaign but weren’t able, no matter. You can join any time as a member of Hidden City–we count on reader support to keep the servers humming.

About the author

Hidden City co-editor Nathaniel Popkin’s latest book is the novel Lion and Leopard (The Head and The Hand Press). He is also the author of Song of the City (Four Walls Eight Windows/Basic Books) and The Possible City (Camino Books). He is senior writer and script editor of the Emmy-winning documentary series “Philadelphia: The Great Experiment” and the fiction review editor of Cleaver Magazine. Popkin's literary criticism appears in the Wall Street Journal, Public Books, The Kenyon Review, and The Millions. He is writer-in-residence of the Athenaeum of Philadelphia.



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