SEPTA Considers Bus Rapid Transit In City Branch

 

BRT in Bogatá, Colombia

About the author

Stephen Currall recently received his BA in history from Arcadia University. Before beginning doctoral studies, he is pursuing his interest in local history, specifically just how Philadelphians engage their vibrant past. Besides skimming through 18th century letters, Steve is also interested in music and travel.

Send a message!



3 Comments


  1. PLEASE TELL ME THIS BRT ISN’T GONNA HAPPEN! Viaduct greenes proposal is by far the best idea.
    LOOK! A 3 mile. Linear park which doubles as a alternate transit way. ( biking , walking. ) is a no BRAINER and I’d guess the cheapest.. Does anyone think a bus line is gonna help those local community’s … You wanna see places transformed? Do the HIGHLINE , no we wouldn’t get or want super rich moving in but you’d sure as hell get a lot of middle income , seniors , and student housing setting up along the park route.. The argument against
    Train service was it goes from nowhere to nowhere… So how do you suppose the brt fares are gonna support
    It’s operational costs….. It won’t !! The mayor wants more park space well here it is!! You wanna make north Philly whole again with what’s below vine street ? Bring the park across the expressway and connect it up to the convention ctr roof and over to the reading terminal markets roof.. THE WOULD BE GREAT AND DO ALOT MORE FORVTHE CITY THAN A BUS LINE NOBODY WANTS BUT SEPTA !!!

  2. What makes the High Line work in New York City is its accessibility to most of the city’s residents. It’s never more than a block or two from subway stations which provide accessibility to residents from the Bronx, Brooklyn, and Queens. That sort of transit accessibility is sorely lacking in Fairmount, while the area features what may be one of the densest concentrations of bike paths in the City of Philadelphia. I hate to echo the Victorians who claimed users of Marc Brunel’s Thames Tunnel would suffer ill effects of miasma, but I can think of few places more depressing to walk than the dank tunnel under Pennsylvania Avenue when I could be walking past the Art Museum and along the Schuylkill.

    It’s also worth noting that at the western end of the tunnel there are still active CSX freight tracks which pass under the Art Museum. It is really not going to be particularly pleasant to walk or bike through the tunnel between (probably) 24th and 27th during times when a freight train is entering or exiting the tunnel’s northern portal. And perhaps most importantly, CSX will likely have some say regarding the potential access to their tracks any ped/bike path would create. The Pennsylvania Avenue tunnel may be very wide, but the Art Museum tunnel is a very tight single track tunnel which could spell doom to anyone foolish enough to try to use it as a shortcut. Inviting thousands of people into the tunnel’s portal raises the possibility of more people attempting to pass through the CSX tunnel down to the Schuylkill.

  3. The Reading Viaduct might make a nice park (or maybe not), but that has no bearing on whether the City Branch would.

    Plus, w/r/t costs, keep in mind that a park isn’t simply a matter of planting a tree and walking away. As Inga Saffron pointed out in her article on the City Branch the other day, the city can barely afford to keep Rittenhouse Square looking presentable. And at least it has photosynthesis going for it.

Recent Posts
Fabric Row Clothed In Light

Fabric Row Clothed In Light

February 10, 2016  |  Morning Blend

Fabric Row gets new street lighting, affordable housing set for Point Breeze, North Philly museum provides setting for short film, and Dranoff gets an assist from Squilla > more

The Life And Death Of Callowhill

The Life And Death Of Callowhill

February 10, 2016  |  Harry K's Encyclopedia

Callowhill Street is now a two-way from 2nd Street to Columbus Boulevard, changing the one-way east-heading regulation that has been in place since I-95 was built. Harry K connects the new ordinance with the salty history and sad ending of the surrounding neighborhood > more

Water Taxiing To The Navy Yard?

Water Taxiing To The Navy Yard?

February 9, 2016  |  Morning Blend

A plan for water taxing to the Navy Yard, The Gallery redevelopment delayed once more, PennDOT to reconfigure Franklin Institute’s Winter Street, SEPTA looking to increase El capacity, and more scenes of Philly in the snow > more

Low Income Housing For Artists In West Powelton To Break Ground

Low Income Housing For Artists In West Powelton To Break Ground

February 8, 2016  |  Buzz

Affordable live-work space project in West Philadelphia will provide stable rent costs to area artists > more

In South Philly, Rethinking Urban Agricultural

In South Philly, Rethinking Urban Agricultural

February 8, 2016  |  Morning Blend

“Farm to folk” in South Philadelphia, Philly’s newest poetess, celebrate the Year of the Monkey at Reading Terminal, West Philly High redevelopment moving along, and the last month of the Fabric Workshop and Museum’s latest exhibit > more

Flexible Flyer Factory Glides Into Obscurity

Flexible Flyer Factory Glides Into Obscurity

February 8, 2016  |  Vantage

If it wasn't for Philadelphia and the S.L. Allen & Co. the mortality rate of snow sledders at the turn of the century would have been much higher. The farming implement maker introduced steering to sleds in 1900 with their popular Flexible Flyer, taking winter recreation by storm. New contributor Robert Masciantonio has the backstory and takes us inside the old manufacturing plant in Fairhill > more