Furness Week in the Daily

November 13, 2012 |  by  |  Furness Week

 

What Would Frank Think? by Nathaniel Popkin
We have a week of insights and great stories about Philadelphia’s greatest architect Frank Furness during the second annual Frank Furness Week here on the Hidden City Daily

 

The Beginning and End of Frank Furness, by GrojLart
What can these two buildings possibly have in common? Why the hand of Frank Furness, of course. The Shadow kicks off Furness week with the story of Frank book-ends: his first and last surviving commissions

 

With Pen & Paper, Frank Looks East, by Michael Lewis
Furness scholar Michael J. Lewis brings us rarely seen caricature drawings by Furness and the story of his striking relationship with the Japanese painter Kubota Beisen.

 

A Long Life in Limbo, by Aaron Wunsch
University of Pennsylvania professor of historic preservation Aaron Wunsch delves into the history of Furness & Hewitt’s 19th Street Baptist Church in South Philadelphia, explains why the building fell into disrepair, and lays out why restoration presents such a conundrum.

Furness Rising, by Nathaniel Popkin
A century after his death the expressive architecture of Frank Furness is broadening the Philadelphia narrative and expanding our sense of what contemporary architecture can be, says George Thomas, the driving force behind Frank Furness 2012.

Unmitigated Beauty, by Hidden City Staff
Day Four of Furness Week brings us a luscious photo essay featuring one of Furness’s remaining masterpieces, the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. Plus we took a side trip up to the attic above the skylights–it doesn’t like Grandma’s!

 

Frank Furness Week on the Hidden City Daily sponsored by:

The Athenaeum’s exhibit “Face and Form: The Art and Caricature of Frank Furness,” curated by Michael J. Lewis as part of the Athenaeum’s symposium, “Frank Furness: His City, His World,” opens November 30.


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