With The Hurricane Lurking, A “Haunted” Horse Parade

 

Photo: Theresa Stigale

Tucked away on Northwestern Avenue just below Germantown Avenue–on the very edge of Philadelphia–is the 83 year old Northwestern Equestrian Facility. The stable’s annual “Haunted Horse Parade” took place there yesterday. Prizes were given out for scariest, funniest, and most creative horse costumes.

Since 1929, the stables have served the Philadelphia community, offering riding lessons, children’s programs and private boarding. Northwestern operates community partnerships with the Police Athletic League, the Boy Scouts, and with the Philadelphia Department of Parks and Recreation.

Photo: Theresa Stigale

“Our main mission is to offer programs that benefit the community–it’s actually required as part of our Lease with the city,” said Northwestern’s executive director Marie Reilly. “Our aim is to make the stables open and accessible as a true community resource and to welcome kids and adults of all ages to get involved with equestrian activities. Some of these children have never even seen a horse in person.”

Northwestern is also home to the city’s official 4-H equestrian club, which started there in September, 2011.

Photo: Theresa Stigale

Photo: Theresa Stigale

Photo: Theresa Stigale

Photo: Theresa Stigale

Photo: Theresa Stigale

About the author

Theresa Stigale was born and raised in Southwest Philly. She earned a B.B.A. from Temple University in 1983. Theresa is a photographer as well as a licensed Pennsylvania Real Estate Broker, developer and instructor. In the past ten years, she has documented the loft conversion projects that she and her partners have completed in Philadelphia, from stately old abandoned warehouses covered with graffiti to vintage factories, some still active with manufacturing. Visit her web site at TheresaStigalePhotography.com.

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