Why North Broad Matters

 

Photo: Hidden City Daily

Because the shoe stores, the dress shops, the movie theaters, the cafeterias, the tap rooms, the newsstands, the lunch counters, the camera stores, the jazz clubs, the delicatessens, the hotels, the butchers, the produce peddlers, the banquet halls, the arcades, the hardware men, the cigar shops, the discounters, the booksellers, the paint stores, and the shirt tailors have vanished, because Ridge Avenue and Erie Avenue, and Kensington and Allegheny, and Front and Olney, and Cecil B. Moore (Columbia) Avenue and Woodland and Point Breeze and Lehigh are bare shades of themselves, because even Center City lacks a multi-plex or an all-night diner, because South Broad and Snyder hangs on, because East Passyunk is lifting off and West Passyunk pushes out, because Frankford is going doubletime, because Philadelphia is only now remembering what it means to be and act and feel like a big city, this is why North Broad Street matters.

Photo: Hidden City Daily

The storms of deindustrialization, suburbanization, racism, poverty, and decline swept from us the essential bones of the modern city, eviscerated these places of scale and ambition, the crowded corners, and cut short the urban night. And so we rolled our cityselves into our little row house apartments, and sat on our stoops, and kept our dreams neighborhood dreams, parochial dreams, quiet dreams. And Philadelphia in the last half of last century reverted to its Colonial-era repute: the quietest city in the world.

Fragmented and disconnected, we turned our backs on the remnants of the industrial city–it was too painful to watch it all wash away–and declared ourselves, if we could declare anything, the descendants of the 18th century city. Bought and sold ourselves on charm and intimacy (not bad things, but not enough).

This is why the massive investment that is coming to North Broad Street–the street of dreams, if ever the was one in Philadelphia–matters. This was the street that swelled with hot money and long nights. There is in fact enough space and sky to build onward for decades and to make some people very rich.

That isn’t enough, of course. One great avenue can’t make up for the drifting apart of a dozen others, and no plan to activate the built environment can reverse intensifying urban poverty. But it can remind us of a central narrative that’s been missing as we tell and retell the Philadelphia story.

About the author

Hidden City co-editor Nathaniel Popkin’s latest book is the novel Lion and Leopard (The Head and The Hand Press). He is also the author of Song of the City (Four Walls Eight Windows/Basic Books) and The Possible City (Camino Books). He is senior writer and script editor of the Emmy-winning documentary series “Philadelphia: The Great Experiment” and the fiction review editor of Cleaver Magazine. Popkin's literary criticism appears in the Wall Street Journal, Public Books, The Kenyon Review, and The Millions. He is writer-in-residence of the Athenaeum of Philadelphia.



4 Comments


  1. This is why a casino must not replace what was once one of the city’s most essential institutions; the symbolism would complete the demise of North Broad Street.

  2. This is why North Broad Street must not become another playground to Philadelphia’s rich, hip, or corporate elite akin to Northern Liberties. A casino (Inquirer Building) , luxury re-Starr-rants (Ridge Avenue Men’s Shelter), and luxury apartments (Divine Lorraine)can be only part of North Broad’s resurgence…

    “shoe stores, the dress shops, the movie theaters, the cafeterias, the tap rooms, the newsstands, the lunch counters, the camera stores, the jazz clubs, the delicatessens, the hotels, the butchers, the produce peddlers, the banquet halls, the arcades, the hardware men, the cigar shops, the discounters, the booksellers, the paint stores, and the shirt tailors have vanished”

    This is a picture of a multi-class, multi-racial North Broad Street. It this is the aesthetic we are striving for, then it is imperative that as citizens and community members we call for balanced and responsible development for all of Philadelphians, not just the privileged few.

Leave a Reply

Comment moderation is enabled, no need to resubmit any comments posted.

Recent Posts
Archeologists Dish Up Dirt On Philly History Under I-95

Archeologists Dish Up Dirt On Philly History Under I-95

March 28, 2017  |  Vantage

Contributor Jared Brey takes us under the overpass and down in the trenches of the 95 Revive archeological excavation where field workers are piecing together centuries of lost Philadelphia history > more

The Gallery: Finally The Destination Ed Bacon Hoped For?

The Gallery: Finally The Destination Ed Bacon Hoped For?

March 23, 2017  |  Vantage

PREIT's transformation of The Gallery into an upscale shopping outlet promises to be the suburban-minded downtown destination that the first mall failed to deliver. Contributor Chris Giuliano takes a look at the redevelopment of East Market and Edmond Bacon's original plan. > more

New Life For An Old Coal Country Outpost In Society Hill

New Life For An Old Coal Country Outpost In Society Hill

March 20, 2017  |  The Shadow Knows

The Shadow takes a stroll down to Society Hill where business is stirring at an old 19th century coal company headquarters after 12 years of vacancy > more

New Exhibition Gives Movement To The Philadelphia School

New Exhibition Gives Movement To The Philadelphia School

March 17, 2017  |  Buzz

Two fans of Modernism re-evaluate architectural history with the exhibition, "What Was the Philadelphia School?" > more

Tracking The Evolution Of Industry At 34th And Grays Ferry

Tracking The Evolution Of Industry At 34th And Grays Ferry

March 16, 2017  |  Vantage

The site of Penn's new riverside research campus has a long, decorated history of industrial enterprise. Contributor Madeline Helmer dives deep into the backstory > more

Emergency Excavation In Old City Reveals Lack Of Oversight

Emergency Excavation In Old City Reveals Lack Of Oversight

March 15, 2017  |  News

The last-minute salvage excavation of First Baptist Church Burial Ground in Old City has the archaeological community up in arms. Is the City or the developer to blame? John Henry Scott reports > more