Philadelphia Film Society To Lease Roxy Theater, Vision Is For Long Desired Film Center

 

  • The Roxy Theater has a new lease on life, says The Inquirer. The Philadelphia Film Society has found a home in the space, planning to extend the tenor of its film festival throughout the year when it begins to offer a distinctly indie and foreign flare on the first of next year. Even though landlord John Ciccone is working with the PFS to help with the Rittenhouse Square area landmark’s rejuvenation, executive director Andrew Greenblatt admits “it’s going to be a phased process, as we raise the money so we can pay for it.”
  • This past weekend, the Philadelphia Open Studio Tours opened the doors of several artist workshops in the Northwest to the public. The Center for Emerging Visual Artists holds the tours in order to connect the general public with the artists–and perhaps increase sales, says James Calamia, of the Roxborough Development Corporation. “People in the community don’t really know that [the artists] are there and so by having this gallery, we can bring in art that’s already here to people in the neighborhood.” The second and final weekend of the tours will take place on October 20-21, featuring artists and studios in the Northern Liberties and Old City.
  • This Friday, several groups will hold a promotion of the excitement of a growing Lancaster Avenue commercial corridor. “We’ll transform the empty storefronts at 3848-52 Lancaster Avenue, have artists and crafters showing their work and wares and will provide plenty of food, drink, music, and good company all evening long.” For more information, click HERE.
About the author

Stephen Currall recently received his BA in history from Arcadia University. Before beginning doctoral studies, he is pursuing his interest in local history, specifically just how Philadelphians engage their vibrant past. Besides skimming through 18th century letters, Steve is also interested in music and travel.

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1 Comment


  1. I hope they can fix the rat and mouse problem in there. It would be nice if they had the money to buy the Boyd and fix it up. That would be great.

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